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Electives - Diploma Programs

Spring 2017 Electives - Diploma Programs

General Education Course Descriptions Diploma Programs


(Cambridge) Friday 8:00AM – 11:00AM

Social and Cultural Understanding at Cambridge

PSYC1090 –Social Psychology: Social Relations

Have you ever wondered why there is so much aggression, and so little altruism? Why are some people attracted to some people? Why are some people the target of prejudice? Why are some people miserable, and others in similar circumstances incredibly happy? Psychology is the scientific study of how people think about, influence and relate to one another. 

You will be introduced to theories and research concerning social relations and how they influence attitudes and behavior. Throughout the course the methods used by social psychologists to study social relations will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of everyday behavior, with particular emphasis on social relations in the workplace.

SOC1030 – Sociology I (Hamelinck)
Online

Have you ever wondered if one's life circumstance is due to fate or personal choice? Together, we will systematically examine this and other perplexing worldly questions by exercising a well sought after sociological imagination.

PSYCH1010 – Psychology (Schultz)
Online

Did you ever wonder about what happens when we sleep or what parts of your brain are active when you speak? How would you define ‘normal’ behaviour? This overview of the field of psychology introduces students to a user’s manual to their own and others’ brains, behaviours, and feelings. Examine various psychological perspectives to learn what famous psychologists believe is the cause of abnormal psychology or the right treatment for different mental disorders. 

Gain insight into your own life, by relating theories of learning, personality, and emotion to your own experiences and explore how humans alter their states of consciousness. Emphasis is placed on how knowledge of psychology is an asset for successful personal and career life.

Arts in Society at Cambridge

LIBS1940– Identity in Popular Culture: From Avatars to Vampires (Johnson)

Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school?  Or do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity.  Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value.

Students in this course will explore current ideas about what makes us human within an historical context, comparing our popular ideas to those of the past.  Students will observe how human identity is constructed and presented in narratives through a survey of different media, from short stories to graphic novels to film and television.  In each medium, fictional identities such as gaming avatars, ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and zombies will provide clues to the puzzle of what makes us human and how we decide who we are.

Science and Technology at Cambridge

LIBS1980 - Life Beyond Earth (Samuel)
Online

The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. 

With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth.  

In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. 

Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. 

Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Block A (Doon Campus) Tuesday 1:00PM – 4:00PM

Foreign Languages Doon Block A

FREN1000 – French Culture and Language I (Giumelli)

This introductory French culture and language course has a strong focus on Canada. You will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. 

The cultural components (60%) of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills (40%) introduced throughout the units. The course is very interactive and emphasizes politics, history and the social world.

SPAN1000 – Spanish Culture & Language I (Michniewicz)

This course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. You will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment (60%), while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language (40%). 

Come ready to use your new language in class and learn about the rich and complex contemporary social, cultural and political components of Latin America.

Social and Cultural Understanding Doon Block A

PSYC1090 –Social Relations (De Pasquale)

Have you ever wondered why there is so much aggression, and so little altruism? Why are some people attracted to some people? Why are some people the target of prejudice? Why are some people miserable, and others in similar circumstances incredibly happy? 

Psychology is the scientific study of how people think about, influence and relate to one another. You will be introduced to theories and research concerning social relations and how they influence attitudes and behavior. Throughout the course the methods used by social psychologists to study social relations will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of everyday behavior, with particular emphasis on social relations in the workplace. 

PSYCH1010 – Psychology (Schultz)
Online

Did you ever wonder about what happens when we sleep or what parts of your brain are active when you speak? How would you define ‘normal’ behaviour? This overview of the field of psychology introduces students to a user’s manual to their own and others’ brains, behaviours, and feelings. 

Examine various psychological perspectives to learn what famous psychologists believe is the cause of abnormal psychology or the right treatment for different mental disorders. Gain insight into your own life, by relating theories of learning, personality, and emotion to your own experiences and explore how humans alter their states of consciousness. Emphasis is placed on how knowledge of psychology is an asset for successful personal and career life. 

SOC1030 – Sociology I (Hamelinck/K. MacDonald/Lin)
Online

Have you ever wondered if one's life circumstance is due to fate or personal choice? Together, we will systematically examine this and other perplexing worldly questions by exercising a well sought after sociological imagination.

Arts in Society Doon Block A

LIBS1940 – Identity in Popular Culture: From Avatars to Vampires (Johnson)

Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school?  Or do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity.  Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value. 

Students in this course will explore current ideas about what makes us human within an historical context, comparing our popular ideas to those of the past.  Students will observe how human identity is constructed and presented in narratives through a survey of different media, from short stories to graphic novels to film and television.  In each medium, fictional identities such as gaming avatars, ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and zombies will provide clues to the puzzle of what makes us human and how we decide who we are.

Science and Technology Doon Block A

LIBS1980 – Life Beyond Earth (Samuel) 
Online

The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. 

With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. 

In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. 

Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. 

We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Civic Life Doon Campus Doon Block A

LIBS1160 – Essentials of Canadian History (Simpson)

In this course you will learn about how we invented Canada with the introduction of Confederation in 1867. We will explore major themes such as war, race, gender and children, Aboriginals, Quebec separation and together we will ponder how we, as Canadians, negotiate these themes from the past in how we live today.

Block C (Doon) Friday 1:00PM – 4:00PM

Civic Life Doon Block C

LIBS1980 – Life Beyond Earth (Samuel)
Online

The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. 

With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth.  

In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. 

Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. 

Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

LIBS1160 – Essentials of Canadian History (Simpson)

In this course you will learn about how we invented Canada with the introduction of Confederation in 1867. We will explore major themes such as war, race, gender and children, Aboriginals, Quebec separation and together we will ponder how we, as Canadians, negotiate these themes from the past in how we live today.

Personal Understanding Doon Block C

HEAL1020 – Wellness: The Better You (Carter)

This course will introduce you to the concept of wellness. You will develop strategies for a healthy lifestyle in all aspects of your life. Through traditional lectures and experiential learning activities you will learn in both individual and group processes. 

You will investigate wellness as it applies to mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress-management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health. "Wellness: The Better You" provides the opportunity to evaluate your present lifestyle, identify your successes and develop areas requiring personal growth.

LIBS1650 – Quest for Wisdom (Chen)

This course gives students the opportunity to study philosophical anthropology by examining what it means to be human and what it means to be wise. Through discussion, reading, writing and the viewing of films we will focus on the answers given to us by science, philosophy, spirituality and technology. 

We will attempt to understand the meaning of our existence as we quest and weave through the roads established by death, emotion, pleasure, disease, hostility, hospitality, spirituality and love, rationality, art and tragedy, community and conflict.

This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. 

Social and Cultural Understanding Doon Block C

PSYCH1010 – Psychology (Schultz)

Online

Did you ever wonder about what happens when we sleep or what parts of your brain are active when you speak? How would you define ‘normal’ behaviour? This overview of the field of psychology introduces students to a user’s manual to their own and others’ brains, behaviours, and feelings. 

Examine various psychological perspectives to learn what famous psychologists believe is the cause of abnormal psychology or the right treatment for different mental disorders. Gain insight into your own life, by relating theories of learning, personality, and emotion to your own experiences and explore how humans alter their states of consciousness. Emphasis is placed on how knowledge of psychology is an asset for successful personal and career life.

SOC1030 – Sociology I (Hamelinck)

Online

Have you ever wondered if one's life circumstance is due to fate or personal choice? Together, we will systematically examine this and other perplexing worldly questions by exercising a well sought after sociological imagination.

Arts in Society Doon Block C

LIBS1930 – Science Fiction (Bettle)

This course will explore Science Fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies.  

Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all.  Students will understand the role of SF as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

Online Only
(For students scheduled for online option only)

Please note online classes may have limited availability after the first two weeks of registration.

Arts in Society Online Only Option

LIBS1650 – Quest for Wisdom (Chen)

This course gives students the opportunity to study philosophical anthropology by examining what it means to be human and what it means to be wise. Through discussion, reading, writing and the viewing of films we will focus on the answers given to us by science, philosophy, spirituality and technology. We will attempt to understand the meaning of our existence as we quest and weave through the roads established by death, emotion, pleasure, disease, hostility, hospitality, spirituality and love, rationality, art and tragedy, community and conflict.

This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. 

Civic Life Online Only Option

LIBS1160 – Essentials of Canadian History (Simpson)

In this course you will learn about how we invented Canada with the introduction of Confederation in 1867. We will explore major themes such as war, race, gender and children, Aboriginals, Quebec separation and together we will ponder how we, as Canadians, negotiate these themes from the past in how we live today.

Science and Technology Online Only Option

LIBS1980 – Life Beyond Earth (Samuel)

The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. 

With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. 

We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. 

Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Condensed Courses (Doon Campus)

Arts in Society Condensed

LIBS1930 – Science Fiction (Bergstrom)
Doon Tues.-Fri. May 2-24, 2017

This course will explore Science Fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. 

 Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of SF as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

Science and Technology Condensed

LIBS1980 – Life Beyond Earth (Samuel)
Online May 8-June 23, 2017

The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. 

With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. 

 In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. 

Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. 

Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

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