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Courses
Course # Courses Status
OLRN1298 Anthropology

Description: This course seeks to develop an appreciation for the mystery of human development and to put this development into the perspective of the entire Earth's history. The course examines the physical, emotional and technological changes that man has experienced. When one has completed this course, one should have a good and fundamental understanding of the evolution of man and an appreciation for what humans have accomplished and will continue to accomplish.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
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OLRN1113 Environmental Site Assessment and Reporting

Description: This course provides students with the understanding of the theory and practice of Environmental Assessment approaches that are the principal means of integrating environmental considerations into governmental decision-making.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
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OLRN1123 Forest Measurement - Theory

Description: This foundation course will introduce you to the tools and instruments used in tree and forest field measurements. Learn how to measure, describe, and make use of tree diameter, height, age, and density information.
Hours: 32
Credits: 2
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CoRequisites:

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OLRN1487 Global Warming Concepts

Description: Students will develop an awareness of the current scientific certainties in global warming versus what is not certain, historical and current political issues at a global and national level, including topics such as the Kyoto agreement, ethical responsibilities of individuals, corporations, and governments, and the conflictions between economic development and the environment. This course provides the opportunity for students to develop greater understanding of social awareness and the relationship between science, technology and an individual's responsibility to society and the environment.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
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OLRN1119 Introduction to Geology: An Overview of Planet Earth

Description: Geology is the most exciting and hands-on of the sciences. It is the study of a dynamic Earth that is changing on a daily basis due to tectonic activity, volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, meteorite strikes, tsunami and more. This course is an ‘Introduction to Geology' and it outlines the formation of the Earth—in context of the formation of the Universe and Solar System. It examines the history of the Earth and of the Moon and its formation. This is followed by an examination of the properties of the Earth, its dynamic activities, its rocks and minerals and fossils and the uses of rocks and minerals. The course closes with an examination of the careers that are associated with Geology.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
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OLRN1258 Let's Talk Sports

Description: This subject combines both the fun of participating in lively sports debates and the practical techniques that will help students to improve their communication skills. Students will receive a behind-the-scenes look at sport issues by examining topics such as sport and politics, commercialism, and the Olympic movement. Through this course, students will better understand the major problems and controversies surrounding the impact of sports upon society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
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OLRN1121 Minerals

Description: Mineralogy is the study of the crystals that comprise rocks. This course studies minerals. It is a course that allows the student to become very knowledgeable about minerals and to enjoy their beauty. The course begins by explaining what minerals are, their composition and their classification. The concept of mineral formation is followed by the use of descriptive and identifying properties. The student is introduced to the use of a ‘key'. After having learned how to identify important minerals, the student will be introduced to some of the fascinating minerals on Earth: gemstones, ore minerals and essential minerals. The course concludes by examining various mineral collecting sites of the world.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
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OLRN1124 Oceanography

Description: The world's oceans are spectacular in their beauty, majestic in their power and domineering in terms of their effects on climate. Oceans are a source of bountiful food and are home to tremendous numbers and varieties of species. It is very important to possess a good understanding of how the ocean's work. Our future as a species depends upon the oceans that surround each and every continent. This course examines the oceans from an historical, geographical, geological and biological perspective. The course makes use of an excellent textbook that guides us through the ‘story of the oceans'. Each week, the student will explore a different topic. In order, these topics are: history of oceanography, ocean waters, the productivity of the oceans, seafloor sediments, Plankton and Nekton, ocean currents, waves, tides and the Benthos.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
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LIBS1560 Our Domain: Geography and Human Populations

Description: In this course, students are encouraged to develop an understanding of the interdependent relationship between geography and the location of human populations. Through scientific inquiry, students will study the world's geographic landscape, the global processes that shape planet earth, and their relationship to the location of climates and the natural resources required to sustain healthy societies. Challenges and opportunities related to demands for natural resources, energy, agricultural and economic productivity will be explored along with the ever increasing impact our accelerating population growth is having on shaping our planets future and the life that inhabits it.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
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OLRN1283 Sports Psychology

Description: This course examines the individual components of how one's mind works - a valuable tool for performance in specific sporting events. Concepts of psychology are discussed and applied in past, present and future contexts. This course evaluates what goes into optimal levels of athleticism in examining how players, coaches and even fans of the sports get psyched.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
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OLRN1249 Westerns: A Study in the Film Genre

Description: This class will explore the film genre of Westerns. Major themes, theories and ideas will be examined via the work of selected actors, directors and films. Subjects to be studied via discussion and assignments include The History of the Western / Components of the Western / Landscape and Setting / Actors / Directors / Films / Indigenous Peoples. The course will conclude with an analysis of the place of the Western in a contemporary context – can it still ‘sit tall in the saddle'?
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
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OLRN1288 World Religions: Western and Eastern Traditions

Description: This course examines various ways in which Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism have transformed over time and responded to new environments, circumstances, and challenges. In an effort to better understand these “living religious traditions,” this course will examine each religion's founding narratives and figures, the histories of their religious traditions and their diversification, their theological doctrines, mystical traditions, rituals, concepts of life, death and time, and conceptions of the relationship between religion and ethical, social and political life. Students will also be required to understand, and encouraged to think through, some of the basic methodological and interpretive issues involved in the academic study of religion, especially those surrounding cultural diversity and evaluative judgment, as well as various non-religious based theories, from psychology to economics, as to why religions exist.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Details

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