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Bachelor of Community and Criminal Justice

Credential:
Bachelor of Community and Criminal Justice
College Code:
CONS
School:
Health & Life Sciences and Community Services
Program Code:
1240C
Accelerated Delivery:
No
Campus:
DO
Academic Year:
2017 / 2018

About the Program

This program, delivered at the honours level, provides students with the skills to analyze the reasons for crime and the various approaches to crime prevention, as well as the means to support healthy and safe communities. It emphasizes the importance of inter-agency and inter-professional collaboration in addressing both individual and societal issues related to crime. Students develop strong problem-solving skills, systemic/critical thinking and interpersonal communication skills to become leaders within the community justice and criminal justice systems. Graduates are prepared to research, initiate, implement, and evaluate social policy and programs.

Students participate in a co-op placement within probation and parole offices, correctional facilities, treatment facilities, police services, various residential centres and other community justice agencies benefiting from the strong base of community programs already existing within the Region of Waterloo.

Graduates of other criminal justice/social service programs should contact the program coordinator for information regarding their eligibility for advanced standing.

Program Information

Length: Four-year Academic Co-operative Bachelor's degree program
Delivery Sequence: Doon (Kitchener) - September/2017 (Open) - Fall | Winter | Fall | Winter | Fall | Winter | Spring/Summer | Fall | Winter
Location: Doon (Kitchener)
Start: September
First-Year Capacity: 30

Note:

Bachelor's Degrees in Applied Areas of Study

Conestoga's Bachelor's degrees:

Admission Requirements

Note re: Admission Requirements

Admission Procedures

Program Requirements

Tuition & Fees

Tuition fee details for the 2016-2017 year are listed below. Fees for the next academic year are unavailable at this time. Books and supplies are additional.

Domestic Fees

Estimated fees based upon the previous academic year (2016 / 2017) for Bachelor of Community and Criminal Justice - Program # 1240c

Doon - Fall 2016 Level 1 & 2 (Program Start: 2016-09-06)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28
Full time Degree Tuition $3450.00 $3450.00
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56
CSI Health Plan Fee $286.00 $0.00
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50
Session Total $4359.53 $4016.53
Year Total   $8376.06
Doon - Fall 2016 Level 3 & 4 (Program Start: 2015-09-08)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28
Full time Degree Tuition $3450.00 $3450.00
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56
CSI Health Plan Fee $286.00 $0.00
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50
Session Total $4359.53 $4016.53
Year Total   $8376.06
Doon - Fall 2016 Level 5 & 6 & 7 (Program Start: 2014-09-02)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017 Spring 2017
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45 $0.00
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80 $0.00
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80 $0.00
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30 $0.00
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35 $0.00
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28 $0.00
Full time Degree Tuition $3450.00 $3450.00 $0.00
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49 $0.00
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00 $0.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56 $0.00
CSI Health Plan Fee $286.00 $0.00 $0.00
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50 $0.00
Session Total $4359.53 $4016.53 $0.00
Year Total   $8376.06  
Doon - Fall 2016 Level 8 & 9 (Program Start: 2013-09-03)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28
Full time Degree Tuition $3450.00 $3450.00
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56
CSI Health Plan Fee $286.00 $0.00
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50
Session Total $4359.53 $4016.53
Year Total   $8376.06

International Fees

Estimated International fees based upon the previous academic year (2016 / 2017) for
Bachelor of Community and Criminal Justice - Program # 1240c


Doon - Fall 2016 Level 1 & 2 (Program Start: 2016-09-06)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017
International Program Tuition $6500.00 $6500.00
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00
ISR $375.00 $375.00
International Health Fee $550.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50
Session Total $8048.53 $7441.53
Year Total   $15490.06

Doon - Fall 2016 Level 3 & 4 (Program Start: 2015-09-08)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017
International Program Tuition $6500.00 $6500.00
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00
ISR $375.00 $375.00
International Health Fee $550.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50
Session Total $8048.53 $7441.53
Year Total   $15490.06

Doon - Fall 2016 Level 5 & 6 & 7 (Program Start: 2014-09-02)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017 Spring 2017
International Program Tuition $6500.00 $6500.00 $0.00
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45 $0.00
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80 $0.00
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80 $0.00
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30 $0.00
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35 $0.00
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28 $0.00
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49 $0.00
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00 $0.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56 $0.00
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00 $0.00
ISR $375.00 $375.00 $0.00
International Health Fee $550.00 $0.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50 $0.00
Session Total $8048.53 $7441.53 $0.00
Year Total   $15490.06  

Doon - Fall 2016 Level 8 & 9 (Program Start: 2013-09-03)
Description Fall 2016 Winter 2017
International Program Tuition $6500.00 $6500.00
Student Priority Fee $49.45 $49.45
Recreation/Athletics Fee $68.80 $68.80
Graduation/Alumni Services Fee $27.80 $27.80
Administration Fee $25.30 $25.30
Technology Enhancement Fee $133.35 $133.35
Program Services Fee $66.28 $66.28
CSI Capital Development Fee $68.49 $68.49
CSI Association Fee $110.00 $110.00
CSI - CSA $4.56 $4.56
Health Documentation Fee $57.00 $0.00
ISR $375.00 $375.00
International Health Insurance $0.00 $0.00
International Health Fee $550.00 $0.00
ONE Card Fee $12.50 $12.50
Session Total $8048.53 $7441.53
Year Total   $15490.06

Financial Assistance

The Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) is a needs-based program designed to help Ontario students cover the cost of post-secondary education. Funded by the federal and provincial governments, OSAP is intended to promote equality of opportunity for post-secondary studies through direct financial assistance for educational costs and living expenses. These interest-free loans are intended to supplement your financial resources and those of your family. The majority of students apply for loan assistance via the OSAP website. Students can also print the application booklet through the OSAP website.

For more information, please visit Financial Services/Awards.

Co-op Information

Graduate Opportunities

Graduates will be well prepared for careers as probation and parole officers, police officers, community workers, front-line youth workers, policy analysts and program planners within government. Graduates may also work in crime prevention and response, community building, and within regulatory agencies. Training in criminal justice and human behaviour provides meaningful preparation for those seeking positions within other criminal justice fields including institutional corrections and border security. Scholarly and analytical skill development will also provide a strong foundation for those wishing to pursue graduate training in related disciplines.

On average, 81% of graduates from the last three years (2013 to 2015) found employment within six months of graduation.

For more details on related occupations, job market information and career opportunities, see the Government of Canada website: http://www.workingincanada.gc.ca

Pathways & Credit Transfer

Conestoga pathways enable students to build on their academic achievements in order to earn a degree or additional credential. Pathways are formed through agreements between Conestoga programs or partner institutions. View the transfer agreement opportunities for this program.

Often applicants have earned credits from another college or university that may allow a student to be granted advanced standing or exemption. Learn more about credit transfer opportunities at Conestoga.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR)

Conestoga recognizes prior learning of skills, knowledge or competencies that have been acquired through employment, formal and informal education, non-formal learning or other life experiences. Prior learning must be measurable at the required academic level and meet Conestoga standards of achievement for current courses. Challenge exams and portfolio development are the primary methods of assessment. Other methods of assessment may be available depending upon the nature of the course objectives. Successful completion of the assessment results in an official course credit that will be recorded on the student's Conestoga transcript. PLAR cannot be used by registered Conestoga students for the clearance of academic deficiencies, to improve grades or to obtain admission into a program.

Learn more about PLAR.

Program Courses

Course Details
Course Code Course Title and Description
Level 1
ENGL71000 Academic Communications

Description: This course is intended to develop the communication skills required in academic studies, which will translate into useful writing and presentation skills in Canada's increasingly intercultural professional and technical domains. Students will practice planning, drafting, and revising documents. The complex process of researching, creating, and revising arguments will encourage critical thinking, grammatical writing, and appropriate citation skills. Correct formatting of research papers and effective oral presentation skills will be emphasized.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW71100 Canadian Criminal Justice System

Description: This course covers the central components of the Canadian Criminal Justice System including the major criminal justice agencies and the way the agencies operate to identify, apprehend, process and control offenders. The integration of the Canadian Criminal Justice System is examined in light of contemporary social, political and economic issues. Changes to legislation, innovations in technology and changes in the types of crimes being committed and their impact are considered.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC71240 Psychology: Basic Processes Of Behaviour

Description: Psychology is the study of behaviour - that of humans and other creatures. This one-semester course is about the basic concepts of psychological research methods, learning, memory, perception, states of consciousness, motivation, and emotion.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC71115 Sociology and Social Issues

Description: This course deals with human interaction, group formation and social structure. The focus is the analysis of Canadian social institutions and the social processes that impact our everyday lives. The unique perspective that sociology offers for analyzing social issues will be a recurring theme throughout the course.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC71500 Group Dynamics

Description: This course will focus on comprehensive theoretical understanding of group process, personal skill development and application through intensive team work. These skills are of critical importance in both professional and social settings. Through guided exploration and application of theoretical paradigms and practical strategies, students will achieve the necessary skills to succeed in and lead effective teams. The course consists in an intensive experiential approach – learning by doing – enabling participants to become effective, practiced team members with experience applying skills necessary for leadership, analysis and evaluation, problem solving, and conflict management. Individual and team activities enhance participants' skills to work with a variety of personalities in diverse situations, and to effectively assume various professional roles within a team.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Electives: Interdisciplinary
Student must complete a minimum of 42 Hours
Interdisciplinary Elective Details
Level 2
LAW71110 Introduction to Law

Description: The student will be introduced to Canadian law and the Canadian legal system by becoming familiar with the language of the law and terminology used throughout the administration of justice. Recognition of how “law” is established through judicial and legislative authority will be developed and the concepts and principles which form the structure of both civil and criminal law will be examined. The foundation of all government authority will be analyzed through an introduction to the Constitution Act, 1982, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The student will develop legal research and legal analysis skills to locate, interpret and apply statute and case law. Completion of this course will serve as the framework for the more practical applications of law developed in the progressive semesters.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW71120 Interpersonal Communication

Description: This course will introduce the student to theories of communication between individuals and within groups. Concepts affecting communication including positioning, posturing, observing behaviour and reflective listening will be explored. Students will be introduced to the various methods of composing questions. Barriers to effective communication, including cultural differences will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to practice skills both in the classroom and the community through assignments.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW71450 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice

Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the intellectual tradition of moral philosophy and help them develop practical analytical and critical skills through reading, writing and discussion. This course focuses on ethical issues faced by individuals working in the Canadian Criminal Justice System. It helps students to clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision-making. Students will explore a variety of moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, minority rights, racism, biomedical technology, capital punishment, pornography, discrimination, poverty, environment and war. These questions do not admit of easy answers, because there are often plausible sounding moral reasons to be given on each side of the matter. In part because of this, there is a tendency to want to set aside these questions as unanswerable, and more a matter of opinion. Yet they cannot be ignored. Those in criminal justice must be conscious of the implications of blindly following rules. This is a course which will focus on and practice skills of critical reasoning, and learn to express carefully, verbally and in writing, our reasons for a given position
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC72105 Developmental Psychology

Description: Developmental psychology is the study of the process of change and continuity throughout the life of individuals. The course will follow the progression of these changes and continuities from conception through infancy, childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. The course will examine the theoretical, research and applied knowledge that has been gained in this discipline. Essential in this course will be an exploration of the contributing factors to both normal and abnormal developmental outcomes, such as deviance, mental health difficulties and health and wellness.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites: LIBS7240 or PSYC71240
CoRequisites:

SOC71590 Human Rights

Description: This course will examine how human rights norms are established to overcome serious inequities and oppression amongst humans. Some protect us against the worst sorts of suffering that people can encounter, including violence, torture, and enslavement. Others confront discrimination based on sex, ethnicity, race, religion, or disability. There are also those which aim to ensure that each person enjoys decent standards of income, health, education, and employment. The course will examine the historical development of human rights, culminating in an examination of current U.N. and Canadian legislation.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Electives: Interdisciplinary
Student must complete a minimum of 42 Hours
Interdisciplinary Elective Details
Level 3
LAW72300 Criminology

Description: This course develops the student's understanding and analysis of why criminals act the way they do, the settings and the transactional character of crime, the response to crime and the impact on victims and society. Various theoretical explanations of criminal behaviour including the sociological, biological and psychological are explored utilizing an integrated approach to analysis and response.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW72315 Introduction to Interviewing

Description: This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of effective interviewing within the context of the justice system. The focus will be on strategies to develop relationships with interviewees, listening skills, demonstrating empathy and the appropriate use of questioning. Special attention will be paid to trust issues and resistance within the interviewing process. Crisis intervention and the use of referrals will also be addressed.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

POLS72100 Political Structures and Issues

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Study of Politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss the most important political institutions in Canada in order to better understand the issues that have both united and divided the country.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC72005 Abnormal Psychology

Description: This course is concerned with psychological theories and research on the nature and treatment of a variety of psychological problems. Abnormal Psychology seeks to understand the biological and cultural roots of psychopathology. The course examines the most common disorders and problems including schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and eating disorders. These are discussed in terms of definitions, models and theories, research evidence, case examples, treatment and treatment efficacy, and future research/treatment directions.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites: LIBS7240 or PSYC71240
CoRequisites:

SOC72000 Social Issues I - Risks and Challenges

Description: This course is designed to enable critical discussion of the causes and consequences of a range of social issues in Canadian society, and the impact of these issues on the justice system. Students will analyze a range of social issues systematically through sociological and legal frameworks. Special emphasis will be placed on addictions, poverty and mental health. Other issues may include alcohol and drug abuse, family violence, gender inequalities, homophobia and unemployment.
Hours: 60
Credits: 4
Pre-Requisites: SOC1110 or SOC71115
CoRequisites:

Electives: Interdisciplinary
Student must complete a minimum of 42 Hours
Interdisciplinary Elective Details
Level 4
HEAL71010 Health and Wellness

Description: This course focuses on theoretical and practical applications of the principles of health and wellness. Students are encouraged to identify and assess their present state of health and wellness skills, and will then be required to apply wellness theory and new health related skills in order to improve and/or maintain their overall wellbeing in the areas of physical fitness, stress management and psychological health, and proper nutrition. Knowledge and skills developed in this course will assist students as they prepare for careers in law enforcement and criminal justice professions. In particular, students will be better equipped to recognize critical work-related stressors, caused by acute physical, mental, and emotional demands, and apply theories and strategies to enable them to minimize their effects.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW72320 Alternative Dispute Resolution Strategies

Description: The student will explore the various mechanisms of alternative dispute resolution and the rationale for each. The student, through practical exercises, will develop the skills necessary to advise a client about Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and to take a matter through a form of ADR. The student will understand the role of a mediator.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW72330 Criminal Code

Description: This course enables the student to analyze the elements of an offence, to classify offences and to identify possible defenses in criminal cases. Students will examine specific elements of selected Criminal Code offences, such as offences against the person, against property and against public order. The student learns the responsibilities and limitations of citizens and officers in the context of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Students will research case law and assess its impact on criminal offences and use case law to argue or defend decisions. Students will prepare reports based on scenarios presented in class.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

POLS72000 Critical Issues in Public Policy and Criminal Justice

Description: This course addresses and extends a foundational aspect of public policy and program development – the ways in which social issues are understood and defined – through an inter-professional focus on human and community development and populations. The focus of this course is on the involvement of members of specific populations with the justice system. The specific populations/experiences of interest may vary from year to year and may include, for example: mental health and addictions, female corrections, seniors, different abilities, Indigenous/Original Peoples.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

RSCH73000 Understanding Research

Description: This course will present an overview of social scientific methods. The course will address the major components of the research process, including development of theoretically informed hypotheses, implementation of theoretical concepts, development of data collection instruments, testing of hypotheses through data analysis, and the presentation of research results. The student will develop the skills necessary to read and critically analyze social science research and discuss the ethics of social research.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Electives: Interdisciplinary
Student must complete a minimum of 42 Hours
Interdisciplinary Elective Details
Level 5
CDEV71050 Co-op and Career Preparation

Description: This mandatory course prepares degree-level students for job searching for their co-op work terms and for post-graduate careers. Students will reflect on their skills, attitudes, and expectations and evaluate and interpret available opportunities in the workplace. Self-marketing techniques using resumes, cover letters, cold-calls, and interviewing will be learned and students will learn the expectations, rules, and regulations that apply in the workplace with regards to social, organizational, ethical, and safety issues while developing an awareness of self-reflective practice that will be required during co-op work term reporting.
Hours: 16
Credits: 1
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

LAW73010 Youth Justice

Description: This course enables the student to get a clear appreciation of the historical/philosophical evolution of the youth criminal justice system. Students will examine and analyze, in the context of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other relevant legislation, the detention, interviewing and processing of young offenders through the criminal justice system. Students will learn to interpret and apply the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in relevant police investigations. In addition, students will be able to summarize and appraise extrajudicial measures which may be employed with a view to aiding and rehabilitating a young offender and the conditions under which they may be used.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW1110 or LAW71110
CoRequisites:

LAW73090 Applied Law - Civil and Labour

Description: Through primary research, the student will have an opportunity to discuss specific issues that arise out of civil law. In addition the student will examine the unionized environment in a law enforcement setting from the viewpoints of both management and labour. Through simulations and experiential exercises the student will develop practical skills in managing these issues. Examples may include collective agreement negotiation, contract administration and grievance proceedings. Students will also have an opportunity to explore contemporary legal issues and to identify future trends in the law which will impact the law enforcement climate.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW1110 or LAW71110
CoRequisites:

SOC73000 Social Issues II-Cultural Diversity

Description: This course expands on the material addressed in Social Issues I by focusing on the ethnic and cultural diversity of Canadian society. Students will examine our multicultural policy and its historical emergence. The relationship between culture, religion and the law in selected cultures is also addressed. Incorporating social and legal explanations of diversity, students develop an understanding of the impacted groups and the interaction strategies which demonstrate respect of diversity. Considerable emphasis is given to ways of working with individuals and groups of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds. Special attention is paid to developing a strong awareness of self as it relates to diversity issues. Students will become actively engaged with a community agency.
Hours: 143
Credits: 5
Pre-Requisites: SOC2000 or SOC72000
CoRequisites:

STAT73100 Applied Statistics

Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts, logic, and issues involved in statistical reasoning. Major topics include descriptive statistics, probability, statistical inference, regression and correlation. The objectives of this course are to give students confidence in manipulating and drawing conclusions from data and provide them with a critical framework for evaluating study designs and results.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: RSCH2000 or RSCH73000
CoRequisites:

Electives: Interdisciplinary
Student must complete a minimum of 42 Hours
Interdisciplinary Elective Details
Level 6
LAW73030 Crime Prevention and Community Safety

Description: This course develops the student's ability to analyze, understand and use various strategies to prevent crime and enhance community safety. The anticipation, recognition, and appraisal of crime risk and the initiation of strategies to reduce or remove crime are studied. Students will be introduced to Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), retail loss prevention strategies and examples of community strengthening with an emphasis on integrated approaches.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LIBS2000 or POLS72000
CoRequisites:

MGMT73000 Leadership Fundamentals

Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of leadership and leadership styles. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to apply basic leadership principles in daily organizational and personal settings, assess different leadership styles, justify their personal style choice, and compare and contrast leadership and management. The course is designed to provide the learner with the knowledge, skills and practical applications required to lead or facilitate groups.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LIBS2000 or POLS72000
CoRequisites:

PSYC73000 Cognitive Psychology in the Justice System

Description: This course introduces students to cognitive psychology with an emphasis on the role of cognition in behaviour. Students will examine the human cognitive process and how individuals deal with real-life situations including problem solving and decision making. Students will examine examples of ineffective cognitive processing and the implications this has for the individual and the community. Students will be introduced to cognitive programs used to assist individuals in modifying behaviour.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: PSYC2000 or PSYC72005
CoRequisites:

SOC73010 Social Issues III-Aboriginal People

Description: Building on the concepts explored in Social Issues II, students will identify and critically examine cultural diversity with respect to Aboriginal populations. Specifically, course content focuses on topics pertaining to cultural and systemic forms of discrimination and oppression of Aboriginal people. The course also increases knowledge and awareness of important teachings/practices across various Aboriginal nations in Canada. Also to be explored are the various government-legislated Acts that have defined Aboriginal people, the colonial impositions made upon them, and conflicts arising over land claims and treaty agreements. The course will end by addressing the healing that is taking place in many Aboriginal communities and their right to self-determination. Students will participate with a community agency dealing with aboriginal issues.
Hours: 143
Credits: 5
Pre-Requisites: SOC3000 or SOC73000
CoRequisites:

Electives: Interdisciplinary
Student must complete a minimum of 42 Hours
Interdisciplinary Elective Details
Electives: Program Option 1
Student must pass 1 Course(s)
LAW73050 Investigation and Evidence

Description: This course is an in-depth analysis of criminal evidence rules and criminal investigation in Canada. Topics include examination of witnesses, real/physical evidence, circumstantial evidence, hearsay evidence and exceptions, and privileged communications. Discussed will be the rules of evidence, Charter implications and other issues related to the collection and presentation of evidence in a court of law. Students will develop the interviewing skills necessary to retrieve information from victims, witnesses and suspects. Forensic requirements, statute law and other related issues are emphasized.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW2330 or LAW72330
CoRequisites:

LAW73080 Offender Management and Supervision for Corrections

Description: In this course students will study the historical and current models for managing offenders in correctional facilities and supervising offenders in the community including evaluation of their effectiveness. The use of case management in partnership with other justice, health and community agencies is explored. Current trends in offender demographics are reviewed.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LIBS2000 or POLS72000
CoRequisites:

Level 7
COOP73000 Co-op Work Term I (Justice)

Description: The co-op work term will provide students with college-approved work experience within a community and criminal justice environment. Through this course students will be provided an opportunity to: build skills (physical and procedural skills including accuracy, precision, and efficiency); assist in the acquisition of knowledge in and application of knowledge gained in the academic setting (concepts and terminology in a discipline or field of study); develop critical, creative, and dialogical thinking (improved thinking and reasoning processes); cultivate problem solving and decision-making abilities (mental strategies for finding solutions and making choices); explore attitudes, feelings, and perspectives (awareness of attitudes, biases, and other perspectives, ability to collaborate); practice professional judgment (sound judgment and appropriate professional action in complex, context-dependent situations); and reflect on experience (self-discovery and personal growth from real-world experience).
Hours: 420
Credits: 14
Pre-Requisites: CDEV1020 or CDEV71050
CoRequisites:

Level 8
LAW74000 Federal and Provincial Statutes

Description: This course will introduce students to Federal and Provincial Statutes most commonly encountered by law enforcement personnel. Provincial Statutes including Provincial Offences Act, Trespass to Property Act, Mental Health Act, and other areas of provincial responsibility will be explored. Federal Statutes related to drugs, firearms, evidence and corrections will also be examined. Students will consider a variety of methods of dealing with community problems and breaches of the law. Students will investigate the impact that legislation has on social interaction and the responses of law enforcement agencies.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW1110 or LAW71110
CoRequisites:

LAW74115 Community Development and Engagement

Description: The community's perception of criminal justice is analyzed including how corrections deals with social issues such as diversity, racism, poverty, addiction and mental illness. Emphasis is placed on acquiring knowledge related to the effective functioning of communities and their inter-relationships with the work of various criminal justice agencies. Major approaches, models of community building, planning effective strategies and working with major systems are studied.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites: LIBS2000 or POLS72000
CoRequisites:

LAW74120 Criminal Justice Administration and Operations

Description: This course examines the organizational framework, authority structure and major functions of representative justice agencies. It examines the contemporary law enforcement agency and its functions, structure, and operational techniques; implications of generalized and specialized units; analysis of line, staff, and auxiliary functions; and current issues facing today's criminal justice agencies.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LIBS2000 or POLS72000
CoRequisites:

SOC74000 Social Issues IV-Emerging Trends and Issues

Description: Expanding on students' learning in Social Issues I, II, and III, this course provides an understanding of the historical, social, economic and political context within which technological advancement takes place. Innovation is a social product, often an expression of current ideology or a response to a social need. Technological innovation can transform the structure of society, its value system, and institutions. Through project-based activities, students will explore the impact, benefits, consequences and implications of global access to information technology. Course content addresses social networking systems, the use of personal camera phones, blogs, the use of the internet for the procurement and dissemination of pornography, hate literature and slander, and other aspects of cyber crime. Law enforcement policies and practices related to detection of terrorist activity and other emerging technological trends in relation to human rights and privacy issues will also be examined.
Hours: 143
Credits: 5
Pre-Requisites: SOC3010 or SOC73010
CoRequisites:

Electives: Program Option 2
Student must pass 1 Course(s)
LAW74030 Applied Communication Skills

Description: Students will learn how written and oral communications are used in all areas of law enforcement. Students will develop and enhance their writing and observational skills through the practical application of notebook entries, general occurrence reports, and crown briefs applicable to law enforcement agencies. They will complete exercises that familiarize them with professional communication practices including diverse techniques used in speaking to various audiences. Additionally, each student will be required to give a briefing in the form of presentation.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW2310 or LAW72315
CoRequisites:

LAW74090 Community Corrections

Description: The history, development, legislation and role of Probation and Parole services in Canada are studied. Models of risk needs assessment and their effectiveness in reducing community risk are evaluated. Inter-disciplinary and systemic approaches involving all aspects of the community to support offenders in not engaging in further criminal behaviour are studied. Current trends with regard to topics such as: monitoring issues, sanctions and sentences will also be explored.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW3030 or LAW73030
CoRequisites:

Level 9
LAW74015 Diversion and Reintegration

Description: This course studies two important aspects of the criminal justice system diversion strategies and the reintegration of offenders to communities. The history, types and success of various diversion and reintegration models are explored with emphasis on the roles of police and corrections. A holistic model which looks at policy, funding, integrating systems, strategies, measuring performance, and involving the public is considered.
Hours: 30
Credits: 2
Pre-Requisites: LIBS2000 or POLS72000
CoRequisites:

LAW74040 Advanced Practice Seminar

Description: In this course students will demonstrate their ability to integrate the knowledge and skills learned throughout their course of studies including their co-op placement. It will entail the development, submission and presentation of a major project. In this project students will demonstrate their understanding of how to work across justice, health, education and social service systems to address the needs of individuals, groups or communities at risk for encountering or being further involved in the Canadian Criminal Justice system. Students will work in a team and will research, prepare and present their analysis and proposed solutions to faculty and peers.
Hours: 143
Credits: 5
Pre-Requisites: LAW4110 or LAW74115
CoRequisites:

LAW74050 International Justice Issues

Description: This course provides a study of current justice issues affecting the world in general and Canada in particular, with particular emphasis on the Canadian criminal justice system. Students will investigate and analyze significant topical national and international issues. Students will compare and contrast the Canadian legal system to those of other countries around the world and will assess the manner in which these differences or similarities can govern legal relationships and law enforcement. Students are required to analyze news articles on a weekly basis to prepare themselves for class discussions and debates.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW4000 or LAW74000
CoRequisites:

LAW74060 Forensic Psychology

Description: This course provides an overview of the relationship between Psychology and the Criminal Justice System. The collection, examination and presentation of evidence for court purposes such as competency evaluations, sentencing recommendations, risk assessments, parole conditions and treatment recommendations are explored. The function and use of forensic psychology with police investigations, court processes, corrections and the interface with mental health system are included.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: PSYC3000 or PSYC73000
CoRequisites:

Electives: Program Option 3
Student must pass 1 Course(s)
LAW74070 Crime Scene Application

Description: This course will introduce students to various types of crime scene techniques and procedures. Through hands-on instruction students will be taught crime scene search patterns, and will gain the knowledge and skills needed to recognize and appropriately document, collect, and preserve evidence from crime scenes. This will include techniques for the recovery of fingerprints, footwear marks, and tool marks. Rules of evidence governing admissibility of physical evidence will also be covered.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW3050 or LAW73050
CoRequisites:

LAW74100 Assessment and Intervention for Corrections

Description: This course explores intake and assessment procedures focusing on classification, risk factors and needs such as health, mental health, addictions, education and employment. A variety of assessment models or instruments will be reviewed as to their effectiveness in assessing risk and needs. Intervention programs to assist with problems such as addiction, anger management, criminal thinking or abuse will be reviewed in terms of their success in assisting offenders to make behavioural changes. Adaptation of programming to reflect the diversity of offenders and their various needs is also explored.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LAW4090 or LAW74090
CoRequisites:

Program Outcomes



Police Studies Outcomes

Program Advisory Committees

The College appoints Program Advisory Committee members for diploma, degree, certificate and apprenticeship programs. Committees are composed of employers, practitioners and recent program graduates. College representatives (students, faculty, and administrators) are resource persons. Each committee advises the Board on the development of new programs, the monitoring of existing programs and community acceptance of programs.

For a list of the current members, please visit our Program Advisory Committees.

Apply Now

Domestic students should apply online at www.ontariocolleges.ca or by phone at 1-888-892-2228.

ONTARIOCOLLEGES.CA
60 Corporate Court
Guelph, Ontario
Canada N1G 5J3

Detailed steps on the application process may help you to apply.

International students should apply online using a Conestoga College International Application Form. Please note: not all programs are open to international students. Interested students should check the listing of open programs on our international students web page before applying.
For program information, call the Information Centre at 519-748-5220 ext 3656.

Additional Information

Conestoga College has been granted a consent by the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities to offer this applied degree for a seven-year term starting July 21, 2009. Conestoga College shall ensure that all students admitted to the above named program during the period of consent will have the opportunity to complete the program within a reasonable time frame. Application to the Ministry for renewal of the consent to deliver is a prescribed and cyclical requirement for all degree programs at all Ontario colleges.

Disclaimer

The College reserves the right to alter information including requirements and fees and to cancel at any time a program, course, or program major or option; to change the location and/or term in which a program or course is offered; to change the program curriculum as necessary to meet current competencies in the job market or for budgetary reasons; or to withdraw an offer of admission both prior to and after its acceptance by an applicant or student because of insufficient applications or registrations, over-acceptance of offers of admission, budgetary constraints, or for other such reasons. In the event the College exercises such a right, the College’s sole liability will be the return of monies paid by the applicant or student to the College.

Students actively registered in cohort delivered programs who take longer than the designed program length of time to complete their studies are accountable for completing any new or additional courses that may result due to changes in the program of study. Unless otherwise stated, students registered in non-cohort delivered programs must complete the program of study within seven years of being admitted to the program.

PROGRAM SEARCH

Program Status
Start DateCampusStatus**
SEP, 2016 Doon Closed
SEP, 2017 Doon Open
** Status applicable to domestic students

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