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Bachelor of Community and Criminal Justice (Honours)

Credential:
Bachelor of Community and Criminal Justice (Honours)
College Code:
CONS
School:
Health & Life Sciences and Community Services
Program Code:
1240C
Accelerated Delivery:
No
Campus:
DO
Academic Year:
2018 / 2019

Interdisciplinary Courses

Employers seek graduates with critical and creative thinking, quantitative reasoning, and literacy and communication skills, who are able to successfully apply their knowledge in the workforce. Having an understanding of society and culture, and having the ability to make intelligent assessments that encompass professional, moral, ethical and social values, will complement a student's education. These learning outcomes are augmented through Conestoga's interdisciplinary curriculum in the Arts and Humanities, Business and Economics, Language and Culture, Science and Mathematics, and Sociology and Social Sciences.

Students are exposed to new theoretical perspectives, forms of thought, and modes of enquiry outside of their main field of study. Each degree program design includes a number of specified and elective interdisciplinary courses. Degree students are eligible to select these interdisciplinary electives from a list of degree-level courses delivered by the various schools at Conestoga, including the School of Liberal Studies and Communications, School of Business & Hospitality, School of Engineering & IT, School of Media & Design, School of Health and Life Sciences & Community Services, and the Conestoga Language Institute.

Please note the following when selecting your interdisciplinary elective/s:

Requirements by Program

The interdisciplinary curriculum of the Bachelor of Applied Health Information Science (BAHIS) degree program includes:

List of Interdisciplinary Courses

When choosing an elective, students must first determine if the course fits within their program timetable for a given semester. Please note that all courses may not be offered in the current academic year. Go to your Student Portal for full timetabling details under My Courses.

The list of interdisciplinary courses for the Bachelor of Applied Health Information Science (Honours) degree program includes:
Arts and Humanities
Course # Courses
ENGL71200 Scientific and Technical Communications

Description: Documents that are written for scientific or technical purposes are written in a very precise and specific way that does not permit variations in interpretation. This course will prepare students to communicate scientific and technical information concisely and accurately using appropriate formats and graphic support. Students will study technical communication theory/ practice and apply the knowledge to creating, critiquing, and presenting technical documents. An oral presentation will emphasize the clear and concise communication of technical details and the use of appropriate visual support for technical information.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72050 The Use of Laughter: Comedy and Satire

Description: At a time when genetic research continues to narrow the gap between us and our closest animal relatives, laughter is emerging as the one uniquely human trait we all possess. Why do we laugh, and what is it that engages our sense of humour? This course will explore comedy and satire as two related, powerful artistic forms, but also as ways of being in the world. Taking off from some key theoretical perspectives on laughter (Hobbes, Freud, Bergson, Bakhtin, etc.), we will focus on comedy and culture; satire and ideology; comedy, satire and gender; comedy and subversion; comedy and the forbidden; comedy and love. The basic premise of the course is that the comic form is many things: a literary genre, a cultural expression, a theraputic/healing art, a means of liberation (and oppression), and a way of conceiving the world around us. The course will cover works ranging from ancient Greek comedy to contemporary film and fiction, as well as readings from psychologists, philosophers, anthropologists and neurologists. Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of comedy and satire, their characteristic features as genres, and their social and psychological functions. Reading selections may vary from year to year.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72170 Studies in English Vocabulary, Diction and Style

Description: This course teaches the origin of scientific and literary terms; foreign phrases in current use; borrowing of words into English from other languages; and the relationship between meaning and culture and meaning and content. It also covers topics of English diction and style and their applications in written communication.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72200 Desire in Literature

Description: Starting with a close reading of 'The Song of Songs' and at least one other ancient text, the course will examine the representation of desire in Western literature from its Biblical beginnings to its contemporary forms. A weekly one-hour lecture, focusing on the essential theoretical concepts and historical coverage, will be complemented with a two-hour discussion/seminar session, devoted to analysis of key works. Five of the two-hour sessions are designated as screening times.
Short readings in theory (Plato, Hobbes, Freud, etc.) will complement a variety of literary texts. The historical and cross-cultural coverage of this course will allow us to consider the ways culture, society, and art shape desire and are in turn informed by it. Reading selections may vary from year to year.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72200 Desire in Literature

Description: Starting with a close reading of 'The Song of Songs' and at least one other ancient text, the course will examine the representation of desire in Western literature from its Biblical beginnings to its contemporary forms. A weekly one-hour lecture, focusing on the essential theoretical concepts and historical coverage, will be complemented with a two-hour discussion/seminar session, devoted to analysis of key works. Five of the two-hour sessions are designated as screening times.
Short readings in theory (Plato, Hobbes, Freud, etc.) will complement a variety of literary texts. The historical and cross-cultural coverage of this course will allow us to consider the ways culture, society, and art shape desire and are in turn informed by it. Reading selections may vary from year to year.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST71000 History of Graphic Design

Description: This course is a survey of the origins, history and theory of graphic design through an examination of prominent movements and people, covering the time periods from ancient civilizations up to mid-twentieth century. This course will introduce the principles, politics and powers of cultures that have influenced design, including concepts of representation related to culture. Lectures will include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional examples, and offer opportunities for field trips related to key concepts presented in the course.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST71230 Essentials Of Canadian History

Description: This course is a study of recurrent themes in public affairs within the historical context of development of Canada from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student's understanding of how our past conditions our present and to develop an appreciation of the forces which will shape our future.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST71230 Essentials Of Canadian History

Description: This course is a study of recurrent themes in public affairs within the historical context of development of Canada from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student's understanding of how our past conditions our present and to develop an appreciation of the forces which will shape our future.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST72040 History of Art I

Description: This course will explore the development of art from Antiquity to the Renaissance, in the social, political, technological and economic contexts. Major artistic traditions will be examined and students will develop an awareness of these traditions in the world around them.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST72050 History of Art II

Description: This course will explore the development of art from the Renaissance to the Second Industrial Revolution, in the social, political, technological and economic contexts. Major artistic traditions will be examined and students will develop an awareness of these traditions in the world around them.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST74100 History of Advanced Structures

Description: This course provides an overview of the history of architecture and the built environment in the context of technical and cultural influences. It seeks to position major periods and technological discoveries in their time and place, and to develop a critical understanding the implications of these on our environments. Following a review of classical, gothic and renaissance periods, the course inspects the technological developments of the industrial revolution, the advent of the modern movement, and subsequent post-modern reactions. The course will introduce the student to the unique structures of large building types such as stadium, airport terminals, museums, performing arts centres, etc. The development and management of these building types will be studied and analyzed.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST74100 History of Advanced Structures

Description: This course provides an overview of the history of architecture and the built environment in the context of technical and cultural influences. It seeks to position major periods and technological discoveries in their time and place, and to develop a critical understanding the implications of these on our environments. Following a review of classical, gothic and renaissance periods, the course inspects the technological developments of the industrial revolution, the advent of the modern movement, and subsequent post-modern reactions. The course will introduce the student to the unique structures of large building types such as stadium, airport terminals, museums, performing arts centres, etc. The development and management of these building types will be studied and analyzed.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL71100 An Introduction to Philosophy

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the main problems of philosophy, including: Are ethical principles relative? Are all persons really at heart egoistic? Does God exist? What is good? What is evil? How can truth be established? Are there causal determinants of choice? What is real? Are ethical and artistic judgments subjective? What kind of society promotes the best life? What is the purpose and meaning of life? The answers to these questions are not obvious. Wars have been fought and continue to be fought over these questions. One might make the case for seeing the history of human cultures as an ongoing attempt to answer these questions. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72130 Quest For Meaning

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to increase their awareness of themselves, others, and their world with a view to under standing the human need for a meaningful existence and the human search for a meaningful life. Using insights from the fields of psychology, philosophy, literature and other subjects, this interdisciplinary course is designed to assist students to better understand the ways in which they are seeking meaning for themselves and to expose students to new possibilities for personal significance.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72700 Critical and Creative Thinking Skills

Description: This course examines the essential elements of both critical and creative thinking, with their application to the solution of problems. It describes the nature of evidence, sound arguments and valid conclusions, faulty reasoning, convergent and divergent thinking, and the creative process. Critical and creative thinking are then applied to problem solving, and both the discussion of ideas and the presentation of information to an audience.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72900 Principles of Ethical Reasoning

Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the intellectual tradition of moral philosophy and help them develop practical analytic and critical skills through reading, writing, and discussion. This course focuses on ethical issues faced by individuals in Canadian society. It helps students to clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision making. Students will explore a variety of moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, minority rights, racism, bio-medical technology, capital punishment, pornography, discrimination, poverty, environment and war. These questions do not admit of easy answers, because there are often plausible-sounding moral reasons to be given on each side of the matter. In part because of this, there is a tendency to want to set them aside as unanswerable, as just a matter of opinion. Yet they cannot be ignored. Rather, these questions require that we think hard about them and address them carefully, and that we explore various underlying presuppositions that we often accept uncritically. As a result, this is a course in which we will focus on and practice the skill of critical thinking, and learn to express carefully, verbally and in writing, our reasoning for a given position.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL73270 Post Modernism

Description: This course gives students the opportunity to learn about and engage with the main philosophies and critical theories that constitute postmodernism and post-structuralism and to apply these to contemporary phenomena such as culture, theatre, music, television, film and architecture. To this end, we will undertake to survey important theoretical statements by such authors as Lacan, Lyotard, Foucault, Irigaray, Kristeva, Baudrillard, Derrida, Virilio and others. We will explore the tension between the dream of utopia and the specter of apocalypse as we examine such themes as the phantasm of contemporary culture, the society of the spectacle, the emergence of new forms of consciousness and technology and the ways in which our culture imagines and negotiates the Other. Finally, students will consider the question of what it means to be human within a postmodern condition of excess.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: PHIL72900, PHIL71100
CoRequisites:

POLS72000 Critical Issues in Public Policy and Criminal Justice

Description: This course addresses and extends a foundational aspect of public policy and program development – the ways in which social issues are understood and defined – through an inter-professional focus on human and community development and populations. The focus of this course is on the involvement of members of specific populations with the justice system. The specific populations/experiences of interest may vary from year to year and may include, for example: mental health and addictions, female corrections, seniors, different abilities, Indigenous/Original Peoples.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

POLS72100 Political Structures and Issues

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Study of Politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss the most important political institutions in Canada in order to better understand the issues that have both united and divided the country.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

RELS72100 World Religions

Description: Religion continues to hold a dynamic position in the lives of many people in the world today. This course will expose students to the traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will study the origins, development, beliefs, sacred writings, mythical images, and practices of these religions. In addition, the method of learning in this course is participatory; students will select, explore, and report on specific theoretical issues such as effects of globalization and colonialism, modernity, and pluralism.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Business and Economics
Course # Courses
ACCT74100 Financial and Managerial Accounting

Description: Today's technology employees need financial management skills to make decisions and manage projects within an organization. This introductory course for non-accounting students covers aspects of both financial accounting and management accounting. Students will be able to apply concepts of financial accounting to both personal and business situations, including the preparation and use of basic financial statements. Management accounting topics will allow the students to understand cost behaviour and its use in decision-making, evaluate capital investments, and prepare operating budgets.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ACCT74100 Financial and Managerial Accounting

Description: Today's technology employees need financial management skills to make decisions and manage projects within an organization. This introductory course for non-accounting students covers aspects of both financial accounting and management accounting. Students will be able to apply concepts of financial accounting to both personal and business situations, including the preparation and use of basic financial statements. Management accounting topics will allow the students to understand cost behaviour and its use in decision-making, evaluate capital investments, and prepare operating budgets.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

BUS71190 Introduction to Business with International Applications

Description: This course will provide a starting point to understanding the functions of business and the similarities and differences between Canadian business and business operations in other countries. Economic systems and forms of business organization will be evaluated. The major functions of business (management, human resources, production, marketing and finance) will be examined in the Canadian environment and compared to the international environment.
Hours: 56
Credits: 4
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

BUS71200 Organizational Behaviour with International Applications

Description: This degree level course is a study of group behaviour and how the effective use of best practices must be adapted for use in an international setting. Topics include motivation; group dynamics; roles, norms and status; decision-making; power and control; conflict; and leadership.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

BUS74000 Professional Sales and Negotiations

Description: This is a course in professional sales and negotiations, exposing students to strategies for selling creative concepts through numerous role playing exercises. Students examine the negotiation process and strategic approaches to develop, strengthen, and manage customer relationships.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ECON71030 Introduction to Macroeconomics with International Applications

Description: This course is a study of the Canadian economy as a whole. It introduces students to principles that are essential to an understanding of contemporary macroeconomic issues facing Canadian society. It examines the structure and performance of the Canadian economy utilizing economic models and aggregate economic indicators such as gross domestic product, employment, unemployment, income and productivity growth, inflation, interest rates, and the impact of domestic and international influences and of government fiscal and monetary policies. Equivalent: OLRN1600 Introduction to Macroeconomics (Internet).
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ECON71050 Introduction to Microeconomics

Description: This Degree Level course introduces students to basic microeconomic terminology, concepts, methodology and theories, and provides an understanding of firm behaviour under various market structures in an international setting, and their application to current global microeconomic issues. Topics of study include: supply and demand, elasticity concepts and their application; consumer theory; production, costs, and the determination of equilibrium price and output under different market models- perfect competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly and oligopoly; government export taxes/subsidies and regulation of the market, and international trade.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MGMT74110 Topics in Management

Description: Using a variety of resources, this course examines a number of specific topics from the disciplines of Management (including Supervision), Human Resources (including Career Management) and Small Business (including a business plan). Designed to meet the needs of technical professionals throughout the early part of their careers, this course focuses on the critical elements of these subject areas.
Most technical professionals will, at a very early stage in their careers, acquire various management duties and be responsible for the supervision of others. This course provides students with a basic functional understanding of management. Graduating students need to learn how to obtain suitable professional employment and how to successfully move up in their organization. In addition, both from a personal perspective and the perspective of a manager, technical professionals need to be aware of the workings of, and supports offered by, the corporate Human Resource Department. Finally students will focus on the skills of the entrepreneur, the workings of small business and the preparation of a small business plan.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MGMT74120 Strategic Management

Description: This course focuses on the use of cases, as well as lectures, to provide a variety of viewpoints relating to the study of Strategic Management. Designed to meet the future needs of technical professionals as they move into the management portion of their careers, students will learn how they will be contributing to the overall direction of their organization. Students will experience all phases of the strategic process including strategic analysis, strategic formulation and strategic implementation. Both external and internal contextual issues are discussed, allowing the student to develop an appreciation of the wide range of techniques and approaches.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MGMT74200 Small Business Management

Description: In this course, students examine the vital role of small business in the Canadian economy and key functions for managing a small business enterprise. Through discussions of case studies, readings and a major project, students apply the functional areas of small business management including operations, human resources, marketing and financial management. Students integrate these functions in a business simulation involving planning and management of client accounts.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MKT71090 Marketing

Description: This degree level course introduces the basic theories and concepts in marketing as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in the management of a company. The application of the marketing concept is illustrated. Other topics include examination of environmental factors, ethics and social responsibility, theories of buying behavior, primary and secondary research, industrial and consumer markets, targeting and positioning.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MKT72200 International Marketing

Description: This is a degree level course in International Marketing designed to expose students to challenges and opportunities that exist in a global environment. Students will examine all aspects of managing the marketing function in an international setting. Students will gain an understanding of key concepts and theories through readings and lectures. Students will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills through in-class discussions and analysis of case studies. Students will apply their knowledge in presentations, by developing an international marketing plan, and by competing in an online international marketing simulation.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: MKT1090 or MKT71090
CoRequisites:

Language and Culture
Course # Courses
CHIN71000 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to Chinese language and culture. Students will develop reading, listening, speaking, writing and culture awareness. Students will also learn the fundamentals of Chinese character writing. This course will be taught in both Chinese and English to facilitate learning of Chinese.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT71000 Cultural Historical and Economical Overview of France and England

Description: Set against the backdrop of globalization, this course examines the cultural, historical, economical and business environments in France and England, while based in Paris and London. The course is held over a two week period, with one week in each city. Over the 2 weeks, students are exposed to a variety of environments where they are required to investigate and interpret the historical and current situation. Seminars, lectures, combined with tours and visits to corporate, historical and cultural sites will ensure a broad delivery of the material
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT71010 Cultural, Historical and Economical Overview of Japan and China

Description: Set against the backdrop of globalization, this course examines the cultural, historical, economical and business environments in Japan and China, while based in Tokyo and Shanghai. The course is held over a two week period, with one week in each city. Over the 2 weeks, students are exposed to a variety of environments where they are required to investigate and interpret the historical and current situation. Seminars, lectures, combined with tours and visits to corporate, historical and cultural sites will ensure a broad delivery of the material.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT72000 World Cultures

Description: World cultures both broadly and deeply affect and are affected by globalization in ways that unify and divide as well as produce equities and inequalities among people and nations. In this course, students will focus on topics pertaining to similarities and differences in world cultures and societies. Incorporating varying perspectives on diversity, students develop an understanding of the impacted groups, develop strategies which demonstrate respect for diversity, and critically examine social change performed on a world stage.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT73000 Contemporary Culture and Design Theory

Description: This course will explore the theories and evolution of contemporary culture and design issues from the Industrial Revolution to present day. The course will cover cultural themes impacting the fields of architecture, interior design and furniture design, including evolving materials, textiles and technologies, shifts in social and economic contexts, and the representation of interior environments in various contemporary global locations.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT73000 Contemporary Culture and Design Theory

Description: This course will explore the theories and evolution of contemporary culture and design issues from the Industrial Revolution to present day. The course will cover cultural themes impacting the fields of architecture, interior design and furniture design, including evolving materials, textiles and technologies, shifts in social and economic contexts, and the representation of interior environments in various contemporary global locations.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT74000 Heritage Conservation

Description: This course investigates the fundamentals of heritage conservation. Heritage conservation includes a broad range of cultural heritage components including, individual and group heritage, buildings, landscapes and archeological sites. Heritage conservation is recognized as providing economic, social and environmental benefits to communities and society. This course is to develop awareness in heritage conservation and its role in modern society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CULT74000 Heritage Conservation

Description: This course investigates the fundamentals of heritage conservation. Heritage conservation includes a broad range of cultural heritage components including, individual and group heritage, buildings, landscapes and archeological sites. Heritage conservation is recognized as providing economic, social and environmental benefits to communities and society. This course is to develop awareness in heritage conservation and its role in modern society.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

FREN71020 Introduction to French Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to standard French as well as Canadian French nuances. It is designed for students to develop basic French skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also study French culture in various contexts around the world. This course will be taught in both English and French to facilitate learning in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

FREN72020 French Language and Culture II

Description: This high beginner course builds on the Introduction to the French Language and Culture. The course is designed to further enhance beginner level language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also explore numerous facets of French Canadian culture. This course will be taught mostly in French with English used to facilitate learning in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN71020 or LANG7020
CoRequisites:

FREN73020 French Language III

Description: This intermediate course builds on French Language and Culture II. Students will continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on academic and professional communication within the French language and workplace cultural context. This course will be taught in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN72020
CoRequisites:

FREN74020 French Language IV

Description: This high intermediate course builds on French Language III. Students will refine French language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing with a focus on academic and professional communication. This course will be taught in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN73020
CoRequisites:

SPAN71010 Introduction to the Spanish Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to Spanish and the cultural variety in the Spanish speaking world. Students will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course will be taught in Spanish and English to facilitate learning in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SPAN72010 Spanish Language and Culture II

Description:
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LANG7010 or SPAN71010
CoRequisites:

SPAN73010 Spanish Language III

Description: This intermediate course builds on Spanish Language and Culture II. Students will continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on academic and professional communication within the Spanish language and workplace cultural context. This course will be taught in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: SPAN72010
CoRequisites:

SPAN74010 Spanish Language IV

Description: This high intermediate course builds on Spanish Language III. Students will refine Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing with a focus on academic and professional communication. This course will be taught in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: SPAN73010
CoRequisites:

Science and Mathematics
Course # Courses
CHEM72000 Chemistry

Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to perform a number of chemistry experiments increasing their practical knowledge, investigation skills, chemical processes in industrial settings and safety awareness. Topics covered may include: chemical reactions, acids and bases, Newton's Law of Cooling, reduction and oxidation, polymerization and synthesis of acetylene.
Hours: 60
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CHEM72000 Chemistry

Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to perform a number of chemistry experiments increasing their practical knowledge, investigation skills, chemical processes in industrial settings and safety awareness. Topics covered may include: chemical reactions, acids and bases, Newton's Law of Cooling, reduction and oxidation, polymerization and synthesis of acetylene.
Hours: 56
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CHEM72005 Chemistry

Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to perform a number of chemistry experiments increasing their practical knowledge, investigation skills, chemical processes in industrial settings and safety awareness. Topics covered may include: chemical reactions, acids and bases, Newton's Law of Cooling, reduction and oxidation, polymerization and synthesis of acetylene.
Hours: 56
Credits: 4
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HEAL71260 Life Balance: The Quest for Wellness

Description: This course will assist you to develop lifelong strategies to balance and improve your lifestyle from a wellness perspective. You will investigate theories and practices of mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health. ‘Life Balance' provides the opportunity to evaluate various theories of wellness and their application to your present and future lifestyles.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HEAL71260 Life Balance: The Quest for Wellness

Description: This course will assist you to develop lifelong strategies to balance and improve your lifestyle from a wellness perspective. You will investigate theories and practices of mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health. ‘Life Balance' provides the opportunity to evaluate various theories of wellness and their application to your present and future lifestyles.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SCIE71000 Introduction to Natural Sciences

Description: This course examines several areas in the natural sciences including astronomy, earth sciences and biology. In the astronomy section, students acquire a basic understanding of the universe, its origins and composition, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars and planets, including those in our own solar system. Cosmology and current ideas regarding space and time are also discussed. In the geology section of the course, students acquire a basic understanding of various geological principles, techniques used in the study of geology and the economic benefits that can be derived from knowledge of geology. In the biology section, students explore basic concepts of various sub-disciplines of biology, thereby gaining an understanding of the nature of life and its complex interactions with the biotic and abiotic environments. Throughout the course, students develop critical thinking and analytical reasoning skills. Students also assess the impact of current research in the Natural Sciences on contemporary society. Practical laboratory and field exercises reinforce the lecture material.
Hours: 56
Credits: 4
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Sociology and Social Science
Course # Courses
LAW71100 Canadian Criminal Justice System

Description: This course covers the central components of the Canadian Criminal Justice System including the major criminal justice agencies and the way the agencies operate to identify, apprehend, process and control offenders. The integration of the Canadian Criminal Justice System is examined in light of contemporary social, political and economic issues. Changes to legislation, innovations in technology and changes in the types of crimes being committed and their impact are considered.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MDIA72280 Introduction to Media Studies

Description: This course provides an introductory overview of the role of the major news/information media within a democratic society and their impact upon the ability of its citizens to make informed decisions. It considers the historical context of journalism in Canada, the major influences affecting the function of the news media and their evolution in a digital age. The course is also designed to enable the student to recognize bias in the news and evaluate news as a social construction.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MDIA72280 Introduction to Media Studies

Description: This course provides an introductory overview of the role of the major news/information media within a democratic society and their impact upon the ability of its citizens to make informed decisions. It considers the historical context of journalism in Canada, the major influences affecting the function of the news media and their evolution in a digital age. The course is also designed to enable the student to recognize bias in the news and evaluate news as a social construction.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC71240 Psychology: Basic Processes Of Behaviour

Description: Psychology is the study of behaviour - that of humans and other creatures. This one-semester course is about the basic concepts of psychological research methods, learning, memory, perception, states of consciousness, motivation, and emotion.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC71700 Psychology of Mindfulness

Description: Mindfulness is the practice of non-judgemental, moment-to-moment awareness in our lives. It is cultivated through paying attention, in a specific way, “non-reactively, non-judgementally, and openheartedly as possible.” In recent years, mindfulness has been recognized as a cognitive skill, that can be taught, and that can enhance the lives of those who practice. In addition, research into the therapeutic value of mindfulness has shown promising results with a variety of psychological afflictions, including; stress, chronic pain, depression, anxiety and mood regulation. The purpose of the course, then, is twofold: a) to introduce students to the personal practice of mindfulness, and b) to explore the applications of mindfulness in evidence-based psychological processes.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC72240 Psychology: Dynamics of Human Behaviour

Description: This course introduces the student to scholarly and scientific research concerning genetics and behaviour, followed by an examination of development throughout the life span. Further topics include: gender and sexuality, sensation and perception, learning, thinking and intelligence, motivation and emotion, and stress, health and human flourishing. Students explore the research process and apply psychological concepts to their lived experience.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC71045 Science, Technology and Society

Description: This theme-based course aims to provide an understanding of the historical, social, economic and political context within which scientific and technological advancement takes place. Innovation is a social product, often an expression of current ideas or a response to a social need. Conversely, technological and scientific innovation can transform the structure of society, its value system, and institutions. Through a series of lectures and student-centered activities, this course will assess the impact, benefits, consequences and implications of the inter-relationship between science, technology and society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC71250 Introduction to Sociology

Description: This course involves the systematic study of human interaction. Sociology offers a unique perspective for examining social issues, understanding cultural diversity and the way socialization shapes personality. The student will also investigate areas such as deviant behaviour, the nature of social change, family structure and social organization. The course will analyze Canadian social institutions,emphasizing the pluralistic nature of Canadian society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC73030 Examining Social Problems in Canadian Society

Description: This seminar style course is designed to enable critical discussion of social construction causes and consequences of a range of social problems in Canadian society, and the policy responses or lack of response. Students will learn how to analyse social problems systematically throught sociological frameworks. Problems include: alcohol and drug abuse, family problems, poverty, gender, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, ageing, education, health and illness, work and the urban environment.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC73140 Canadian Multiculturalism

Description: This is a General Education credit in a Diploma Program. This course examines the ethnic and cultural diversity of Canadian society The study involves an investigation of our multicultural policy and its historical emergence. Special attention is paid to problems of adaptation faced by newcomers to this country. Special attention is focused on Southern Ontario society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC73180 Conflict Management

Description: Without exception, every relationship of any depth has conflict. Conflict can be regarded as a negative force to be avoided or controlled, or it can be seen as an opportunity for strengthening relationships, self-awareness and development. The course will examine different factors that contribute to interpersonal and intrapersonal (intrapsychic) conflicts and discuss and apply appropriate skills and strategies to manage conflicts effectively.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: BUS71200 or SOC71500
CoRequisites:

SOC74020 Urban and Community Planning

Description: This course examines the fundamentals of urban and community planning through an understanding of a wide range of factors that impact how cities and towns develop and evolve. Specifically, students will be introduced to topics related to the discipline of planning including: urban design, land-use planning, environmental planning, social planning, heritage and cultural planning, and economic development and revitalization. Recent trends such as new urbanism, smart growth and sustainable planning and design are also covered. This course will expand student's awareness of the planning field and its responsibility to balance both the public interest and private concerns in development decisions.
The method of leaning in this course is designed to be highly participatory and self-reflective, combining individual and group work with in-class discussion and on-site observation opportunities. Students will apply theories and concepts gained through lectures to practical interpretations of real-world planning conditions and local policies and applications.
Hours: 45
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC74020 Urban and Community Planning

Description: This course examines the fundamentals of urban and community planning through an understanding of a wide range of factors that impact how cities and towns develop and evolve. Specifically, students will be introduced to topics related to the discipline of planning including: urban design, land-use planning, environmental planning, social planning, heritage and cultural planning, and economic development and revitalization. Recent trends such as new urbanism, smart growth and sustainable planning and design are also covered. This course will expand student's awareness of the planning field and its responsibility to balance both the public interest and private concerns in development decisions.
The method of leaning in this course is designed to be highly participatory and self-reflective, combining individual and group work with in-class discussion and on-site observation opportunities. Students will apply theories and concepts gained through lectures to practical interpretations of real-world planning conditions and local policies and applications.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Program Status (Domestic)
Start DateCampusStatus**
SEP, 2018 Doon Open
** Status applicable to domestic students
Program status for international students

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