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Courses - May 2022

Level 1

Course Details

Pronunciation I
ELS1600

Description:

This is the first of four courses in pronunciation. In this course, students begin to learn to produce vowel and consonant sounds through identification of articulators and areas of articulation, air pathways, and vibration of vocal cords. Stress and intonation are introduced.

  • Hours: 70
  • Credits: 5
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Reading Comprehension I
ELS1610

Description:

This is the first of four courses in reading. Vocabulary building is the major focus in this course. Students also practice scanning for information in a variety of everyday texts. Recognizing basic grammatical sentence elements is also emphasized. Both intensive and extensive reading are encouraged.

  • Hours: 70
  • Credits: 5
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Listening and Speaking I
ELS1620

Description:

Students learn language functions used in social interaction. Topics such as the use of telephone and banking services are introduced. Discussion centres around clothing, entertainment, and health. Listening exercises improve aural comprehension.

  • Hours: 70
  • Credits: 5
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Written Communication Skills I
ELS1630

Description:

This is the first of four courses in written communication. Students learn the basic grammatical structures used in speech and writing, with emphasis on the use of basic tense forms and familiarity with the functions of the parts of speech. Basic rules of lexicography are covered. This is then applied to paragraph development. Journal writing is introduced.

  • Hours: 112
  • Credits: 8
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Level 2

Course Details

Pronunciation II
ELS1640

Description:

This is the second of four courses in pronunciation. Factors affecting comprehensibility such as syllable and sentence stress and unstress, intonation and rhythm are a focus. Students continue to learn to produce vowel and consonant sounds and to practice pronunciation features such as linking and spelling/sound correspondence. The correspondence between pronunciation and paralinguistic cues is introduced.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Reading Comprehension II
ELS1650

Description:

This is the second of four courses in reading. Students continue to work on scanning exercises as well as begin to skim short texts related to topics such as health, education, and entertainment. In this course, students begin to focus on recognizing a variety of reading structures. Students use both top-down and bottom-up processing skills to decode meaning from texts. Vocabulary building continues to be a major focus in this course.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Listening and Speaking II
ELS1660

Description:

Students review and continue to learn language functions used in social interaction. Topics such as the use of telephone and banking services are continued. Discussion of emergency procedures, health, entertainment, and education continue. Listening exercises improve aural comprehension, and dictations introduce lecture note-taking skills. Impromptu speeches on a variety of general topics are introduced.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Written Communication Skills II
ELS1670

Description:

This is the second of four courses in written communication. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of basic English structures and verb tenses, including present perfect and past progressive tenses, past participles, modals and gerunds. Structures are practiced in several paragraph types leading to the production of simple essays. In addition, students are required to keep a journal throughout the course. The writing of simple business and personal letters is encouraged.

  • Hours: 84
  • Credits: 6
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Canadian Perspectives I
LIBS1790

Description:

This course introduces students to issues relevant to life in Canada. Students will acquire a basic knowledge of geography, history and government as well as the social and cultural aspects of Canada through current print and electronic materials.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Level 3

Course Details

Pronunciation III
ELS1680

Description:

Specific areas to target are determined through an individual pronunciation analysis. Stress, rhythm, and intonation as features of speech which have great impact on intelligibility are emphasized. Students continue to learn to produce vowels, consonants, and consonant blends through practise and identification of articulators and areas of articulation, air pathways, and vibration of vocal cords. Students are encouraged to listen for their specific pronunciation errors, attempt to self-correct them, and move toward more natural-sounding speech.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Reading Comprehension III
ELS1690

Description:

In this course, students develop analytical and comprehension skills through reading and studying texts of intermediate-level complexity. Pre-reading skills as well as study skills such as making graphic organizers, summarizing, and analyzing formatted text are practised within an academic context. The vocabulary component includes recognition and use of context clues, study of common roots and affixes, and building of academic vocabulary.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Listening and Speaking III
ELS1700

Description:

In this course, students develop fluency in an interactive environment while participating in discussions/debates based on the content of in-class lectures. Students learn appropriate gambits and communication skills for a variety of social situations. Academic skills such as lecture note-taking and presentation skills are introduced and practised. Students deliver several presentations.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Written Communication Skills III
ELS1710

Description:

In this course, students learn the rules of structure necessary to produce clear and grammatically correct paragraphs and essays appropriate to college/university level proficiency. The course includes an in-depth study of verb tenses. Modals, conditionals, gerunds, infinitives, and prepositions are also studied. Students will develop and employ pre-writing, outlining, and editing techniques used in academic writing. Students will write business messages, several short essays reflecting various patterns of essay organization, and a brief research project. Plagiarism and its consequences are presented and discussed.

  • Hours: 84
  • Credits: 6
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Canadian Perspectives II
LIBS1800

Description:

This course enables students to explore the geographical, historical, economical, and political aspects of Canada. In addition, students will research academic and professional aspects of career development in Canada. Current print and electronic materials allow students to examine the challenges and opportunities presented in contemporary Canada.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Level 4

Course Details

Pronunciation IV
ELS1720

Description:

Specific areas to target are determined through an individual pronunciation analysis. Stress, rhythm, and intonation as features of speech which have great impact on intelligibility are emphasized. Students continue to learn to produce vowels, consonants, and consonant blends through practise and identification of articulators and areas of articulation, air pathways, and vibration of vocal cords. Students are encouraged to listen for their specific pronunciation errors, attempt to self-correct their occasional mispronunciation, and to approach fluent, native-like pronunciation.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Reading Comprehension IV
ELS1730

Description:

This course focuses on the development of academic reading strategies and the acquisition of vocabulary. Students practise techniques necessary for success in academic programs. Skills such as skimming, scanning, predicting, making inferences, interpreting exam questions, and reading critically to comprehend and evaluate passages are acquired. Students produce summaries and graphic organizers of academic texts of college-level complexity. Vocabulary development is approached through a systematic analysis of word formation and study of context clues.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Listening and Speaking IV
ELS1740

Description:

This course focuses on academic communication skills necessary for success at a post-secondary level. In the listening component, students practise academic lecture comprehension and note-taking by listening to in-class lectures from a variety of academic fields. Skills such as predicting, evaluating and organizing lecture content are practiced. Students learn appropriate gambits and communication skills for in-class discussions and debates. Students study practical techniques for developing and delivering a variety of oral presentations and participate in individual and group presentations on academic topics.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Written Communication Skills IV
ELS1750

Description:

In this course, students learn and apply complex grammatical structures appropriate to post-secondary level writing, including a review of tenses, gerunds and infinitives. Clauses, modals, and conditionals are also studied. Emphasis is placed on organizational patterns, prewriting techniques, proofreading, and editing. Research techniques such as library and Internet use are developed. Students produce several short essays and reports, and research, format, and document a research paper. Plagiarism and its consequences are presented and discussed.

  • Hours: 84
  • Credits: 6
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Student Success for Higher Learning
LIBS1810

Description:

This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to a Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Electives: Program Option
Student must pass 1 Course(s), selected in the Student Portal from available course options

View Program Option Electives

Please note that all courses may not be offered in all semesters. Go to your student portal for full timetabling details under "My Courses".

Business Computing Applications I
COMP1057

Description:

During this course, the student will learn to effectively use the Windows operating system, apply word processing techniques, create basic business presentations, and explore the power of spreadsheets. Students will also learn the skills necessary to operate effectively within the Conestoga College computing environment. An emphasis will be placed on the development of solutions to business problems using commonly available microcomputer tools.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

English Skills - IELTS and TOEFL Preparation
ELS1760

Description:

This course is designed to provide an overview of the knowledge and skills required for a non-native speaker of English to successfully complete the TOEFL and IELTS tests. Students are taught the listening skills, grammatical structures, reading skills, writing skills, and language functions required to complete both the written and oral sections of these tests. Students will practise answering questions such as those found on the TOEFL and IELTS, and write one practice test of each. One half of the course hours will be spent on each test. Test-taking strategies are also included.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Children's Literature Across Cultures
LIBS1016

Description:

Children across the globe engage with stories as a way of learning about the world and their place within it. What can stories aimed at children tell us about ourselves and our social, political, and cultural world? What can these stories reveal about the values our society wishes to see in its children? How do changing perceptions of childhood shape the kinds of books (stories, plays, poems, and so on) that children’s authors produce? This course aims to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major patterns and themes found in Children’s Literature written in English, with a focus on international texts. Topics to be explored may include family structures, friendship (and other social relationships such as insider/outsider, allies, stranger, or even enemy), community, identity, self-image, adventure, tradition, and the difficult but necessary process of growing up.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Indigenous Studies: The North American Journey
LIBS1025

Description:

This course explores First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Indigenous peoples and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation of Canada's Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional Indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips may include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Oceans
LIBS1036

Description:

This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Anishinaabe 13 Moons: Awakening the Spiral
LIBS1076

Description:

Explore a year of Anishinaabe life by being exposed to various cultural activities practiced throughout a thirteen moon cycle. Anishinaabe is the name of an indigenous people who thrived throughout the woodlands of present day Canada and includes the Ojibway, Mississaugas, and Odawa. By honouring the earth, fire, wind, and water the Anishinaabe lived harmoniously with all of creation. Customary teachings including storytelling, maple sugar making, fishing, wild harvesting, planting, fasting, and sweat lodge ceremonies. These activities are known collectively as “the way of a good life. Awaken the spiral within and learn the four pillars of the Anishinaabe worldview.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Psychology Today: The Human Connection
LIBS1086

Description:

Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.Typical questions and topics covered in this course include: Why are cell phones so addictive? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media?

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines
LIBS1096

Description:

Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

The Olympics
LIBS1101

Description:

The Olympics can be the defining moment for athletes, participating teams, and host countries. This General Education course will take an in-depth look at the impact of the Olympic Games from a social, political, economic, historical, and cultural perspective that can impact both the athlete and the country. The Olympics have altered the way we view traditional sport and this course will dive into controversial topics such as doping, amateur status, gender, and the view of the Olympic journey from varying perspectives.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Introduction to Astronomy
LIBS1171

Description:

In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Issues In World Affairs
LIBS1181

Description:

This course will introduce students to issues confronting our world today and the historical events that led to them. It is organized into four interconnected themes: economics, environment, security, and human rights. Students will be introduced to various topics such as international trade, economic integration, environmental sustainability, regional conflicts, marginalized populations, etc. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better understanding of how world issues manifest on both the local and global scales. The course aims to increase awareness of world issues and engage students as critically conscious global citizens.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music
LIBS1481

Description:

How would you describe the music you've heard in a sacred space? What's your favourite movie soundtrack? What kind of music do you listen to with your friends, and how is it different from the music you might hear in a park or on the street?The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for stage and screen, music among friends, and music in public spaces. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have a purpose in our lives.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Multiculturalism: The Canadian Diversity Project
LIBS1581

Description:

In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Viewing Philosophy Through Film
LIBS1661

Description:

In this course we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. Students will learn to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Exploring the World of Classical Myth
LIBS1961

Description:

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the compelling world of Greek Myths from the prehistoric Mediterranean through the Classical world and beyond, reaching out to 21st century. The course emphasizes the broad diversity of cultural traditions as well as the role of the Greeks and their city-states at the crossroads between Europe, Asia and Africa, exploring classical mythology across the ancient lands stretching from Spain to India, and from the Eurasian steppes to Ethiopia. The legacy of Greek culture helps us to understand what is considered classical and based on core human values. Through interactive lectures, hands-on activities, discussions, and investigative assignments students will experience myth by taking the roles of viewers, listeners, readers and performers. They will examine the nature of myth in multi-faceted and authentic contexts. Students will also uncover the historical kernels of truth behind intricate mythical plots and characters. They will become familiar with the power of eternal literary narratives, archetypal concepts, images and symbols. Seminal discoveries in ancient history, classical archaeology, cultural anthropology, gender studies, psychology, astronomy, and other sciences will assist them with the exploration and in-depth understanding of the universal appeal of Greek Mythology to contemporary society.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters
LIBS1991

Description:

In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Program outcomes

  1. Communicate effectively at a level appropriate to access further academic and vocational studies.
  2. Use complex language structures to convey meaning clearly in both written and oral communication in an academic setting.
  3. Identify, evaluate, and correct individual grammar and pronunciation difficulties in speech and writing in multiple contexts.
  4. Interpret academic-level texts critically using a variety of reading skills as appropriate.
  5. Apply a systematic approach to vocabulary expansion tailored to individual academic and career goals.
  6. Differentiate between and produce a variety of writing styles and formats used in college/university contexts.
  7. Identify main ideas and supporting details in post-secondary lectures and talks in order to demonstrate listening comprehension.
  8. Participate effectively in both formal and informal discussions and presentations in academic contexts.
  9. Develop skills in researching, drafting, editing, and proof-reading a variety of written documents reflecting individual academic and career goals.
  10. Utilize critical thinking and problem solving techniques in the application of research techniques to both oral and written academic assignments.
  11. Employ effective study skills and strategies for success in post-secondary studies in an English language context.
  12. Discuss various aspects of Canadian culture related to social and educational contexts.