Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op)

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Courses - September 2021

Level 1

Course Details

Conestoga 101
CON0101

Description:

This self-directed course focuses on introducing new students to the supports, services, and opportunities available at Conestoga College. By the end of this course, students will understand the academic expectations of the Conestoga learning environment, as well as the supports available to ensure their academic success. Students will also be able to identify on-campus services that support their health and wellness, and explore ways to get actively involved in the Conestoga community through co-curricular learning opportunities.

  • Hours: 1
  • Credits: 0
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Introduction to AutoCAD with Environmental Engineering Applications
DRWG1880

Description:

This course will introduce the basic AutoCAD skills required to create and edit drawings that typically accompany environmental reports. The student will create a site plan including environmental monitoring locations, identifying zones of soil contamination and groundwater plumes, and illustrating laboratory analytical data. The student will create geologic cross-sections to scale using AutoCAD. Drawings will be plotted at appropriate scales on varying paper sizes.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Site Remediation and Development
ENVR2020

Description:

This course studies the process required for the remediation and redevelopment of brownfield sites in the province of Ontario. The course provides and overview of the regulatory requirements associated with the Brownfield redevelopment process. The Phase I/II site assessment activities covered in detail in the Environmental Auditing and Site Assessment course is briefly reviewed and placed in context of the overall process. This course emphasizes Brownfield Site remediation activities that occur after site assessment and characterization is complete. The requirements of the most recent amended version of Record of Site Condition Regulation in relation to site remediation activities will be discussed and applied in the course.The students will complete a Remedial Action Plan (RAP) for a case study site. The RAP will include identification of potential remedial technologies, evaluation of the technical, economic, social, regulatory, and implementability aspects of each technology, and the selection of a preferred technology to cleanup contaminated soils and groundwater at the study site.The students will prepare tender specifications and drawings for the remediation of the study site. An evaluation of actual bids for a brownfield site remediation will be completed. The students will identify site management activities that are conducted during the construction phase of brownfield site remediation. Mock scenarios will be used to demonstrate situations and issues that can arise during the construction phase. The students will identify and distinguish between the roles and responsibilities of the owner, contractor, regulator, and consultants during site remediation activities.This course studies the processes and activities that occur at both rehabilitated Brownfield Sites and Greenfield Sites. Particular emphasis is placed on environmental issues such as storm water management and the impacts of development on groundwater resources.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites: CIVL2040 OR ENVR8080

Field Methods in Environmental Engineering I
ENVR3030

Description:

This is a course dealing with the various field methods and equipment used in environmental engineering. The student will use accepted equipment and protocols to sample various media including soil, groundwater, surface water, sewer discharges, surface water, and sediment. The students will supervise the installation of a groundwater monitoring well, collect soil samples, prepare borehole logs, collect groundwater samples, and perform hydraulic testing,. Survey methods used in environmental work will be reviewed and practiced. QA/QC procedures are studied. The importance of record keeping, data logging, and data management to the legal aspects of environmental projects is emphasized.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Physical Hydrogeology
ENVR3040

Description:

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of physical hydrogeology. The course covers basic physical hydrogeological concepts and definitions as they apply to environmental engineering applications. Concepts and definitions studied include hydraulic conductivity and fluid potential, Darcy's Law, groundwater flow equations, water table, capillary fringe, aquifers and aquitards, piezometer testing, and pump testing. Precautions to be taken during the installation of groundwater monitoring and water supply wells are discussed. Major topics in this course include aquifer properties, groundwater flow, and groundwater resource evaluation.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites: CIVL2115 OR ENVR8080

Environmental Site Assessment
ENVR3080

Description:

The student is instructed in the tasks and activities associated with Phase One and Phase Two Environmental Site Assessments (ESA). These activities include: archival searches, site inspections, and review of owner and regulatory files. Instruction will be provided in the assessment of soil and groundwater analytical data in the context of appropriate legislation and/or guidelines, identification and assessment of Areas of Potential Environmental Concern, and the development of Conceptual Site Models. The implications of Phase One and Phase Two ESAs as they pertain to the Record of Site Condition process are discussed throughout the course. The student is also provided with an introduction to the concepts and process of Risk Assessment under Ontario Regulation 153/04. The student will be required to complete a Phase One ESA and a Phase Two ESA for an actual site selected by the instructor.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites: ENVR3040

Environmental Legislation with Applications
ENVR8020

Description:

This provides a working knowledge of relevant environmental legislation at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels. Emphasis will be placed on the application of environmental laws and regulations to actual situations encountered by consultants, planners, municipalities, conservation authorities, industry and contractors. The course studies the relevance of environmental legislation to environmental issues including air and water quality, solid and hazardous waste management, site assessment and cleanup, emergency planning, spills and noise. The course will provide an understanding of the environmental approval processes and requirements, compliance assessment, cleanup criteria, site decommissioning, monitoring requirements, enforcement, penalties, liabilities, and reporting requirements. Case studies will be used extensively to demonstrate the application of environmental legislation.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Environmental Project I
ENVR8050

Description:

The course requires the completion of an environmental project selected by the student and approved by the instructor. Environmental engineering concepts acquired through course work, work experience, and independent research will be used to address the technical, regulatory, social, and economic issues associated with the project. Project topics will be developed in consultation with professionals from the environmental industry. The project will be completed in teams of 3 or 4 students.For each project topic, a professional from industry will act as a mentor throughout the duration of the course. The mentor will provide their project team with advice and technical expertise and will meet with the project team approximately 4 hours/month. The meetings will occur at the mentor’s place of work and will be scheduled at mutually agreeable times with the student group. Typical projects include Phase One/Two Environmental Site Assessments, a Remedial Action Plan, Contaminated Site Risk Assessment, Environmental Compliance Audits, ISO 14000 Analysis, Landfill Design and Monitoring Report, Engineered Wetland Design, Source Water Protection Plans, Hydrogeological Study, Water Efficiency Study and Reduction Plan, or Stream Rehabilitation Assessment/Plan.A detailed proposal identifying the scope of work, technical approach, project team, schedule, and budget is a course requirement. The proposal will be presented to the class in the first semester of the course.Following the preparation/presentation of the project proposal, each project team will complete the data gathering/literature review portion of the project by the end of the semester.

  • Hours: 28
  • Credits: 2
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Water Quality
ENVR8080

Description:

Water chemistry principles are presented in a manner that relates to environmental applications. The course builds upon the student’s existing knowledge of basic chemical principles (e.g. bonding, nomenclature, reactions). This course includes aspects of the physical and chemical properties of water, water quality indicator parameters, concentration units, chemical equilibrium, chemical partitioning, oxidation-reduction reactions, acid/base reactions, and organic chemistry. These concepts will be applied to solving environmental engineering problems such as contaminant fate, chemical feed rates in water and waste-water treatment, treatment tank sizing, and mass balance calculations related to natural attenuation. An understanding of water and waste-water treatment processes will be developed in the classroom and by visiting local treatment plants (time permitting). Laboratory and field measurements of key water quality parameters will be conducted. The course will discuss governmental regulations pertaining to water analysis and treatment and will assist students in preparing to write the Provincial Water Quality Analyst and Operator In-Training exams.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Level 2

Course Details

Co-op and Career Preparation
CEPR8200

Description:

This series of modules will prepare graduate certificate students for job searching for their co-op work terms with the guidance of a Co-op Advisor. Students will familiarize themselves with the co-operative education policies and procedures and will learn the expectations, rules, and regulations that apply in the workplace regarding social, organizational, ethical, and safety issues while deepening their awareness of self- reflective practices. Students will critically reflect on their skills, attitudes, and expectations and evaluate available opportunities in the workplace. Successful completion of these modules is a requirement for co-op eligibility.

  • Hours: 14
  • Credits: 1
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Solid Waste Engineering & Management
ENVR2015

Description:

This course focuses on the application of technology for managing solid and hazardous waste. The student will be required to apply engineering technology to solve solid waste management issues encountered by industry, consultants, and municipalities. The classifications, characteristics and generation rates of solid waste are reviewed. The importance of recycling, reuse, reduction, and waste diversion techniques/initiatives in the management of solid wastes will be emphasized. Various disposal alternatives including energy from waste, composting and landfilling are investigated. Students will identify waste streams and waste reduction strategies used at selected industrial facilities. The course covers the design of engineering controls for modern landfills in accordance with O.Reg. 232/98. The generation, control, and potential utilization of landfill gas at landfill sites will be studied. Landfill operation issues, siting, monitoring requirements and final land use issues are studied. The course includes field trips to complement classroom instruction. A field trip will be taken to an active landfill site where landfilling techniques, cover methods, leachate and gas control, waste diversion techniques, and household hazardous waste management techniques can be viewed. A field trip will also be taken to a composting facility.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites: ENVR3040
  • CoRequisites:

Field Methods in Environmental Engineering II
ENVR3060

Description:

This is a practical hands-on course that provides instruction on the latest field methods used in environmental engineering. The student will use accepted protocols and equipment to sample asbestos and mould. Global Positioning System equipment will be used to identify sampling locations. The student will be able to accurately identify and classify geologic media in the field according to ASTM standards. The course studies the use of geophysics as a screening tool in environmental assessments. The students will install and sample stream bed piezometers, surface water, sediment, and measure flow rate in a local stream. The students will conduct landfill gas probe monitoring at a local landfill. The students will participate in a mock asbestos removal demonstration.Students will receive training in the field methods employed during environmental cleanups including jar headspace analysis, waste management regulation slump testing and confirmatory sampling requirements. The course emphasizes the application of the concepts learned through the use of labs, field exercises, field demonstrations, and field trips. A field trip will be taken to a local environmental analysis laboratory.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Contaminant Hydrogeology
ENVR8010

Description:

This course studies the behaviour, movement, and control of contaminants in groundwater. Common causes of groundwater contamination are discussed. Basic physical and chemical hydrogeological principles are used to predict contaminant behaviour and movement in groundwater. An introduction to the behaviour and movement of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) is presented. Using commercially available software, the student is required to solve groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites: ENVR3040
  • CoRequisites:

Environmental Project II
ENVR8070

Description:

The students will begin to implement their work plan that was developed in Environmental Project I. Project management skills will be used to track and monitor project cost and schedule throughout the course. The students will develop systems and use scheduling software to track scheduling and the effort spent on the project. Three progress check meetings will be scheduled with faculty throughout the semester.The project findings will be presented in a written technical report. Professionally prepared drawings/figures that support the written report are a requirement. A presentation of the final project results to the class and industry mentor is also a course requirement.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites: ENVR8050
  • CoRequisites:

Contaminated Site Risk Assessment
ENVR8095

Description:

This course provides the student with a foundation in the science and mathematics underlying risk assessments at contaminated sites. The student will be instructed in screening Contaminants of Concern, pathway analysis, exposure assessment, risk characterization, and the development of Property Specific Standards. The purpose and common components of Risk Management Plans will be introduced. The student will perform basic Human Health and Ecological risk calculations as required under Ontario Regulation 153/04 (O.Reg.1534/04).

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites: ENVR2020 AND ENVR3080
  • CoRequisites:

Air Quality
ENVR8100

Description:

The origin, fate, measurement and control of various types of air pollutants are studied in this course. The course reviews the fundamental gas laws and units used to measure air pollution. The origin of various types of air pollutants is outlined. Air pollution problems on the macro scale (acid rain, ozone depletion, greenhouse effect) and the meso-scale (local industrial pollution) are introduced.The methods and protocols used in the measurement of air quality and sampling of emission sources are presented.Meteorological conditions affecting air quality are discussed. Factors affecting and the methods used to model the dispersion of air pollutants are studied. The student will be instructed in the use of regulatory dispersion modelling programs to predict pollutant concentrations at downwind receptor points.Regulatory aspects of air quality issues are covered including approvals, compliance, testing, and enforcement.Various air pollution control technologies are studied including absorption, adsorption, incineration, cyclones, filters, electrostatic precipitation, and biofiltration. Aspects of indoor air quality and noise will also be introduced.

  • Hours: 56
  • Credits: 4
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Soil Vapour Intrusion and Mitigation
ENVR8180

Description:

This course will examine the mechanisms and physical phenomena of soil vapour intrusion. The health effects and behaviours of typical soil vapour contaminants (chlorinated solvents, petroleum hydrocarbons, radon) will be introduced including methods of measurement in indoor air and sub-slab vapour. Soil vapour intrusion mitigation options will be explored with a focus on the design of sub-slab depressurization systems.

  • Hours: 42
  • Credits: 3
  • Pre-Requisites:
  • CoRequisites:

Level 3

Course Details

Co-op Work Term I (Environmental)
COOP8140

Description:

This co-op work term will provide students with college-approved work experience in an authentic, professionally relevant work environment. Students will be provided the opportunity to connect theory and practice by leveraging their academic knowledge to develop specialized vocational skills. The practical applications of this work term will promote students’ awareness of key concepts and terminology in their field, improve their competencies in problem-solving and decision-making, further their application of professional judgement, hone their leadership skills (independently or as part of team), and enhance their capacity to critically analyze and reflect on their demonstrated abilities in the workplace.

  • Hours: 420
  • Credits: 14
  • Pre-Requisites: CDEV8200 OR CEPR8200
  • CoRequisites:

Program outcomes

  1. Develop soil/groundwater/surface water/air/wastewater investigation and sampling programs.
  2. Collect and prepare environmental samples (groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, air, designated building materials) for analysis in accordance with accepted protocols.
  3. Supervise environmental drilling and monitoring well installation programs.
  4. Interpret the results of environmental sampling programs and studies relative to environmental regulations and impacts to the environment.
  5. Identify and evaluate remedial technologies available for the cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater.
  6. Develop, implement, and manage cleanup plans for contaminated sites and accidental spills.
  7. Apply environmental regulations and requirements to situations encountered by stakeholders including consultants, planners, municipalities, conservation authorities,
  8. industry and contractors.
  9. Design and supervise the implementation of the various components of a solid waste management facility including leachate collection and gas control systems, liners and caps, and environmental monitoring systems.
  10. Conduct Phase One and Two Environmental Site Assessments.
  11. Identify waste streams from various industrial processes and identify opportunities for reduction/re-use/recycling and minimization.
  12. Apply basic hydrogeologic concepts to predict the movement, fate, and control of contaminants in the subsurface.
  13. Assist in the completion of human health and ecological risk assessments.
  14. Apply water chemistry principles to solve problems related to contaminant fate/transport in the environment and to processes used in the treatment of water and wastewater.
  15. Predict the movement and dispersion of air pollutants and identify abatement technologies and processes.
  16. Prepare and edit basic drawings of site plans, cross-sections, and details as applied to environmental engineering applications using AutoCAD.
  17. Prepare technical reports and orally present results.
  18. Demonstrate an understanding of employer expectations with regard to academic, practical and attitudinal skills.
  19. Discuss environmental site assessment and remediation work with regards to Hazardous waste.