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Bachelor of Applied Health Information Science (Honours)

Credential:
Bachelor of Applied Health Information Science (Honours)
College Code:
CONS
School:
Health & Life Sciences
Program Code:
1131C
Accelerated Delivery:
No
Campus:
DO
Academic Year:
2019 / 2020
Notice: Students in this program are required to bring a mobile device that meets minimum specified requirements.

Interdisciplinary Courses

Employers seek graduates with critical and creative thinking, quantitative reasoning, and literacy and communication skills, who are able to successfully apply their knowledge in the workforce. Having an understanding of society and culture, and having the ability to make intelligent assessments that encompass professional, moral, ethical and social values, will complement a student's education. These learning outcomes are augmented through Conestoga's interdisciplinary curriculum in the Arts and Humanities, Business and Economics, Language and Culture, Science and Mathematics, and Sociology and Social Sciences.

Students are exposed to new theoretical perspectives, forms of thought, and modes of enquiry outside of their main field of study. Each degree program design includes a number of specified and elective interdisciplinary courses. Degree students are eligible to select these interdisciplinary electives from a list of degree-level courses delivered by the various schools at Conestoga, including the School of Liberal Studies and Communications, School of Business & Hospitality, School of Engineering & IT, School of Media & Design, School of Health and Life Sciences & Community Services, and the Conestoga Language Institute.

Please note the following when selecting your interdisciplinary elective/s:

Requirements by Program

The interdisciplinary curriculum of the Bachelor of Business Administration - International Business Management (IBM) program includes:

List of Interdisciplinary Courses

Arts and Humanities
Course # Courses
DSGN73060 Visual Design

Description: This course will establish fundamental design concepts and processes. Students will explore design principles and typographic conventions. Students will begin to recognize successful composition and visual design in relation to user behaviour. Through design processes students will develop the ability to visualize and make aesthetic decisions to effectively communicate data and information. The course will also introduce students to the opportunities and limitations of inter-active design and accessibility requirements. Students will utilize current interactive design and authoring tools.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL71000 Academic Communications

Description: This course is intended to develop the communication skills required in academic studies, which will translate into useful writing and presentation skills in Canada's increasingly intercultural professional and technical domains. Students will practice planning, drafting, and revising documents. The complex process of researching, creating, and revising arguments will encourage critical thinking, grammatical writing, and appropriate citation skills. Correct formatting of research papers and effective oral presentation skills will be emphasized.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL71200 Scientific and Technical Communications

Description: Documents that are written for scientific or technical purposes are written in a very precise and specific way that does not permit variations in interpretation. This course will prepare students to communicate scientific and technical information concisely and accurately using appropriate formats and graphic support. Students will study technical communication theory/ practice and apply the knowledge to creating, critiquing, and presenting technical documents. An oral presentation will emphasize the clear and concise communication of technical details and the use of appropriate visual support for technical information.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72050 The Use of Laughter: Comedy and Satire

Description: At a time when genetic research continues to narrow the gap between us and our closest animal relatives, laughter is emerging as the one uniquely human trait we all possess. Why do we laugh, and what is it that engages our sense of humour? This course will explore comedy and satire as two related, powerful artistic forms, but also as ways of being in the world. Taking off from some key theoretical perspectives on laughter (Hobbes, Freud, Bergson, Bakhtin, etc.), we will focus on comedy and culture; satire and ideology; comedy, satire and gender; comedy and subversion; comedy and the forbidden; comedy and love. The basic premise of the course is that the comic form is many things: a literary genre, a cultural expression, a theraputic/healing art, a means of liberation (and oppression), and a way of conceiving the world around us. The course will cover works ranging from ancient Greek comedy to contemporary film and fiction, as well as readings from psychologists, philosophers, anthropologists and neurologists. Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of comedy and satire, their characteristic features as genres, and their social and psychological functions. Reading selections may vary from year to year.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72170 Studies in English Vocabulary, Diction and Style

Description: This course teaches the origin of scientific and literary terms; foreign phrases in current use; borrowing of words into English from other languages; and the relationship between meaning and culture and meaning and content. It also covers topics of English diction and style and their applications in written communication.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

ENGL72200 Desire in Literature

Description: Starting with a close reading of 'The Song of Songs' and at least one other ancient text, the course will examine the representation of desire in Western literature from its Biblical beginnings to its contemporary forms. A weekly one-hour lecture, focusing on the essential theoretical concepts and historical coverage, will be complemented with a two-hour discussion/seminar session, devoted to analysis of key works. Five of the two-hour sessions are designated as screening times.
Short readings in theory (Plato, Hobbes, Freud, etc.) will complement a variety of literary texts. The historical and cross-cultural coverage of this course will allow us to consider the ways culture, society, and art shape desire and are in turn informed by it. Reading selections may vary from year to year.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST71000 History of Graphic Design

Description: This course is a survey of the origins, history and theory of graphic design through an examination of prominent movements and people, covering the time periods from ancient civilizations up to mid-twentieth century. This course will introduce the principles, politics and powers of cultures that have influenced design, including concepts of representation related to culture. Lectures will include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional examples, and offer opportunities for field trips related to key concepts presented in the course.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST71230 Essentials Of Canadian History

Description: This course is a study of recurrent themes in public affairs within the historical context of development of Canada from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student's understanding of how our past conditions our present and to develop an appreciation of the forces which will shape our future.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST72040 History of Art I

Description: This course will explore the development of art from Antiquity to the Renaissance, in the social, political, technological and economic contexts. Students will have the opportunity to learn about gathering, researching, and analysing information through the examination of Major artistic traditions. They will develop an awareness of these traditions in the world around them.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST72050 History of Art II

Description: This course will explore the development of art from the Renaissance to the Second Industrial Revolution, in the social, political, technological and economic contexts. Major artistic traditions will be examined and students will develop an awareness of these traditions in the world around them.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST74100 History of Advanced Structures

Description: This course provides an overview of the history of architecture and the built environment in the context of technical and cultural influences. It seeks to position major periods and technological discoveries in their time and place, and to develop a critical understanding the implications of these on our environments. Following a review of classical, gothic and renaissance periods, the course inspects the technological developments of the industrial revolution, the advent of the modern movement, and subsequent post-modern reactions. The course will introduce the student to the unique structures of large building types such as stadium, airport terminals, museums, performing arts centres, etc. The development and management of these building types will be studied and analyzed.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL71100 An Introduction to Philosophy

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the main problems of philosophy, including: Are ethical principles relative? Are all persons really at heart egoistic? Does God exist? What is good? What is evil? How can truth be established? Are there causal determinants of choice? What is real? Are ethical and artistic judgments subjective? What kind of society promotes the best life? What is the purpose and meaning of life? The answers to these questions are not obvious. Wars have been fought and continue to be fought over these questions. One might make the case for seeing the history of human cultures as an ongoing attempt to answer these questions. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72130 Quest For Meaning

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to increase their awareness of themselves, others, and their world with a view to under standing the human need for a meaningful existence and the human search for a meaningful life. Using insights from the fields of psychology, philosophy, literature and other subjects, this interdisciplinary course is designed to assist students to better understand the ways in which they are seeking meaning for themselves and to expose students to new possibilities for personal significance.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72700 Critical and Creative Thinking Skills

Description: This course examines the essential elements of both critical and creative thinking, with their application to the solution of problems. It describes the nature of evidence, sound arguments and valid conclusions, faulty reasoning, convergent and divergent thinking, and the creative process. Critical and creative thinking are then applied to problem solving, and both the discussion of ideas and the presentation of information to an audience.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72900 Principles of Ethical Reasoning

Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the intellectual tradition of moral philosophy and help them develop practical analytic and critical skills through reading, writing, and discussion. This course focuses on ethical issues faced by individuals in Canadian society. It helps students to clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision making. Students will explore a variety of moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, minority rights, racism, bio-medical technology, capital punishment, pornography, discrimination, poverty, environment and war. These questions do not admit of easy answers, because there are often plausible-sounding moral reasons to be given on each side of the matter. In part because of this, there is a tendency to want to set them aside as unanswerable, as just a matter of opinion. Yet they cannot be ignored. Rather, these questions require that we think hard about them and address them carefully, and that we explore various underlying presuppositions that we often accept uncritically. As a result, this is a course in which we will focus on and practice the skill of critical thinking, and learn to express carefully, verbally and in writing, our reasoning for a given position.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

POLS72000 Critical Issues in Public Policy and Criminal Justice

Description: This course addresses and extends a foundational aspect of public policy and program development – the ways in which social issues are understood and defined – through an inter-professional focus on human and community development and populations. The focus of this course is on the involvement of members of specific populations with the justice system. The specific populations/experiences of interest may vary from year to year and may include, for example: mental health and addictions, female corrections, seniors, different abilities, Indigenous/Original Peoples.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

POLS72100 Political Structures and Issues

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Study of Politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss the most important political institutions in Canada in order to better understand the issues that have both united and divided the country.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Language and Culture
Course # Courses
CHIN71000 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to Chinese language and culture. Students will develop reading, listening, speaking, writing and culture awareness. Students will also learn the fundamentals of Chinese character writing. This course will be taught in both Chinese and English to facilitate learning of Chinese.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CLTR73000 Contemporary Culture and Design Theory

Description: This course will explore the theories and evolution of contemporary culture and design issues from the Industrial Revolution to present day. The course will cover cultural themes impacting the fields of architecture, interior design and furniture design, including evolving materials, textiles and technologies, shifts in social and economic contexts, and the representation of interior environments in various contemporary global locations.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CLTR73000 Contemporary Culture and Design Theory

Description: This course will explore the theories and evolution of contemporary culture and design issues from the Industrial Revolution to present day. The course will cover cultural themes impacting the fields of architecture, interior design and furniture design, including evolving materials, textiles and technologies, shifts in social and economic contexts, and the representation of interior environments in various contemporary global locations.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CLTR74000 Heritage Conservation

Description: This course investigates the fundamentals of heritage conservation. Heritage conservation includes a broad range of cultural heritage components including, individual and group heritage, buildings, landscapes and archeological sites. Heritage conservation is recognized as providing economic, social and environmental benefits to communities and society. This course is to develop awareness in heritage conservation and its role in modern society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

FREN71020 Introduction to French Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to standard French as well as Canadian French nuances. It is designed for students to develop basic French skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also study French culture in various contexts around the world. This course will be taught in both English and French to facilitate learning in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

FREN72020 French Language and Culture II

Description: This high beginner course builds on the Introduction to the French Language and Culture. The course is designed to further enhance beginner level language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also explore numerous facets of French Canadian culture. This course will be taught mostly in French with English used to facilitate learning in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN71020 or LANG7020
CoRequisites:

FREN73020 French Language III

Description: This intermediate course builds on French Language and Culture II. Students will continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on academic and professional communication within the French language and workplace cultural context. This course will be taught in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN72020
CoRequisites:

FREN74020 French Language IV

Description: This high intermediate course builds on French Language III. Students will refine French language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing with a focus on academic and professional communication. This course will be taught in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN73020
CoRequisites:

SPAN71010 Introduction to the Spanish Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to Spanish and the cultural variety in the Spanish speaking world. Students will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course will be taught in Spanish and English to facilitate learning in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SPAN72010 Spanish Language and Culture II

Description: This high beginner course reinforces students' knowledge of the Spanish language and reinforces the cultural variety in the Spanish speaking world. Students will develop academic and professional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. This course will be taught mostly in Spanish with English used to facilitate learning in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: LANG7010 or SPAN71010
CoRequisites:

SPAN73010 Spanish Language III

Description: This intermediate course builds on Spanish Language and Culture II. Students will continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on academic and professional communication within the Spanish language and workplace cultural context. This course will be taught in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: SPAN72010
CoRequisites:

SPAN74010 Spanish Language IV

Description: This high intermediate course builds on Spanish Language III. Students will refine Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing with a focus on academic and professional communication. This course will be taught in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: SPAN73010
CoRequisites:

Science and Mathematics
Course # Courses
CHEM72000 Chemistry

Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to perform a number of chemistry experiments increasing their practical knowledge, investigation skills, chemical processes in industrial settings and safety awareness. Topics covered may include: chemical reactions, acids and bases, Newton's Law of Cooling, reduction and oxidation, polymerization and synthesis of acetylene.
Hours: 56
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

CHEM72005 Chemistry

Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to perform a number of chemistry experiments increasing their practical knowledge, investigation skills, chemical processes in industrial settings and safety awareness. Topics covered may include: chemical reactions, acids and bases, Newton's Law of Cooling, reduction and oxidation, polymerization and synthesis of acetylene.
Hours: 56
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SCIE71000 Introduction to Natural Sciences

Description: This course examines several areas in the natural sciences including astronomy, earth sciences and biology. In the astronomy section, students acquire a basic understanding of the universe, its origins and composition, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars and planets, including those in our own solar system. Cosmology and current ideas regarding space and time are also discussed. In the geology section of the course, students acquire a basic understanding of various geological principles including Earth's structure and materials, Earth's history, Earth's processes and the impact of natural disasters Current research into the prediction of natural disasters and the study and use of Earth's materials are also discussed In the biology section, students examine various sub-disciplines of biology, thereby gaining an understanding of the nature of life and its complex interactions with the biotic and abiotic environments. The impact of and preventative measures for spread of infectious diseases, advancements in DNA technology and the health of our biosphere are also discussed. . Research methods are also discussed and the impact of current research in the Natural sciences in contemporary society is assessed. Throughout the course, students develop critical thinking and analytical reasoning skills.
Hours: 56
Credits: 4
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Sociology and Social Science
Course # Courses
LAW71100 Canadian Criminal Justice System

Description: This course covers the central components of the Canadian Criminal Justice System including the major criminal justice agencies and the way the agencies operate to identify, apprehend, process and control offenders. The integration of the Canadian Criminal Justice System is examined in light of contemporary social, political and economic issues. Changes to legislation, innovations in technology and changes in the types of crimes being committed and their impact are considered.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

MDIA72280 Introduction to Media Studies

Description: This course provides an introductory overview of the role of the major news/information media within a democratic society and their impact upon the ability of its citizens to make informed decisions. It considers the historical context of journalism in Canada, the major influences affecting the function of the news media and their evolution in a digital age. The course is also designed to enable the student to recognize bias in the news and evaluate news as a social construction.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC71240 Psychology: Basic Processes Of Behaviour

Description: Psychology is the scientific study of human thought processes, emotions and behaviour. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thought processes to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the basic processes of human behaviour. The course begins with a brief history of psychology and its emergence as a science. Areas of study include: the biological bases of behaviour; memory consciousness; social psychology; emotion; personality and psychological disorders and their treatment.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PSYC72240 Psychology: Dynamics of Human Behaviour

Description: This course introduces the student to scholarly and scientific research concerning genetics and behaviour, followed by an examination of development throughout the life span. Further topics include: gender and sexuality, sensation and perception, learning, thinking and intelligence, motivation and emotion, and stress, health and human flourishing. Students explore the research process and apply psychological concepts to their lived experience.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

RSCH73000 Understanding Research

Description: This course will present an overview of social scientific methods. The course will address the major components of the research process, including development of theoretically informed hypotheses, implementation of theoretical concepts, development of data collection instruments, testing of hypotheses through data analysis, and the presentation of research results. The student will develop the skills necessary to read and critically analyze social science research and discuss the ethics of social research.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC71045 Science, Technology and Society

Description: This theme-based course aims to provide an understanding of the historical, social, economic and political context within which scientific and technological advancement takes place. Innovation is a social product, often an expression of current ideas or a response to a social need. Conversely, technological and scientific innovation can transform the structure of society, its value system, and institutions. Through a series of lectures and student-centered activities, this course will assess the impact, benefits, consequences and implications of the inter-relationship between science, technology and society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC71250 Introduction to Sociology

Description: This course involves the systematic study of human interaction. Sociology offers a unique perspective for examining social issues, understanding cultural diversity and the way socialization shapes personality. The student will also investigate areas such as deviant behaviour, the nature of social change, family structure and social organization. The course will analyze Canadian social institutions,emphasizing the pluralistic nature of Canadian society.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC73030 Examining Social Problems in Canadian Society

Description: This seminar style course is designed to facilitate critical discussion of the social construction, causes, and consequences of a range of social problems in Canadian society, and evaluate the policy responses, or lack thereof. The course includes the application and integration of sociological theories. Students will learn to use the sociological imagination, how to analyse social problems systematically, and will explore whether individual or societal solutions are needed. The topics will provide opportunities to challenge hidden assumptions, and includes focus on the significance of: age, class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Problems will include: alcohol and drug abuse, family problems, poverty, education, health and illness, work, and the urban environment.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC73140 Canadian Multiculturalism

Description: This course examines the ethnic and multicultural diversity of Canadian society including a historical look at immigration and how the Canadian government has treated its inhabitants. Integral to the course is an overview of the emergence of Canada as a model of cultural pluralism. Students will also explore how Canada and more specifically Ontario, has attempted to protect the rights of its citizens. In addition, attention is paid to the challenges that are faced by newcomers and Aboriginal people. This course also provides an opportunity for students to look at a variety of different world religions and to share their own experiences.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SOC74020 Urban and Community Planning

Description: This course examines the fundamentals of urban and community planning through an understanding of a wide range of factors that impact how cities and towns develop and evolve. Specifically, students will be introduced to topics related to the discipline of planning including: urban design, land-use planning, environmental planning, social planning, heritage and cultural planning, and economic development and revitalization. Recent trends such as new urbanism, smart growth and sustainable planning and design are also covered. This course will expand student's awareness of the planning field and its responsibility to balance both the public interest and private concerns in development decisions.
The method of leaning in this course is designed to be highly participatory and self-reflective, combining individual and group work with in-class discussion and on-site observation opportunities. Students will apply theories and concepts gained through lectures to practical interpretations of real-world planning conditions and local policies and applications.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Program Status (Domestic)
Start DateCampusStatus**
SEP, 2019 Doon Open
** Status applicable to domestic students
Program status for international students

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