Bachelor of Engineering - Mechanical Systems Engineering

Credential:
Bachelor of Engineering
College Code:
CONS
School:
Engineering & Technology
Program Code:
1066C
Accelerated Delivery:
No
Campus:
CA
Academic Year:
2020 / 2021

Interdisciplinary Courses

Employers seek graduates with critical and creative thinking, quantitative reasoning, and literacy and communication skills, who are able to successfully apply their knowledge in the workforce. Having an understanding of society and culture, and having the ability to make intelligent assessments that encompass professional, moral, ethical and social values, will complement a student's education. These learning outcomes are augmented through Conestoga's interdisciplinary curriculum in the Arts and Humanities, Business and Economics, Language and Culture, Science and Mathematics, and Sociology and Social Sciences.

Students are exposed to new theoretical perspectives, forms of thought, and modes of enquiry outside of their main field of study. Each degree program design includes a number of specified and elective interdisciplinary courses. Degree students are eligible to select these interdisciplinary electives from a list of degree-level courses delivered by the various schools at Conestoga.

Please note the following when selecting your interdisciplinary elective/s:

Requirements by Program

List of Interdisciplinary Courses

When choosing an elective, students must first determine if the course fits within their program timetable for a given semester. Please note that all courses may not be offered in the current academic year. Go to your Student Portal for full timetabling details under My Courses.

The list of interdisciplinary courses for the Bachelor of Engineering - Power Systems Engineering degree program includes:
Arts and Humanities
Course # Courses
ENGL72050 The Use of Laughter: Comedy and Satire

Description: At a time when genetic research continues to narrow the gap between us and our closest animal relatives, laughter is emerging as the one uniquely human trait we all possess. Why do we laugh, and what is it that engages our sense of humour? This course will explore comedy and satire as two related, powerful artistic forms, but also as ways of being in the world. Taking off from some key theoretical perspectives on laughter (Hobbes, Freud, Bergson, Bakhtin, etc.), we will focus on comedy and culture; satire and ideology; comedy, satire and gender; comedy and subversion; comedy and the forbidden; comedy and love. The basic premise of the course is that the comic form is many things: a literary genre, a cultural expression, a theraputic/healing art, a means of liberation (and oppression), and a way of conceiving the world around us. The course will cover works ranging from ancient Greek comedy to contemporary film and fiction, as well as readings from psychologists, philosophers, anthropologists and neurologists. Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of comedy and satire, their characteristic features as genres, and their social and psychological functions. Reading selections may vary from year to year.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

HIST71230 Essentials Of Canadian History

Description: This course is a study of recurrent themes in public affairs within the historical context of development of Canada from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student's understanding of how our past conditions our present and to develop an appreciation of the forces which will shape our future.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL71100 An Introduction to Philosophy

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the main problems of philosophy, including: Are ethical principles relative? Are all persons really at heart egoistic? Does God exist? What is good? What is evil? How can truth be established? Are there causal determinants of choice? What is real? Are ethical and artistic judgments subjective? What kind of society promotes the best life? What is the purpose and meaning of life? The answers to these questions are not obvious. Wars have been fought and continue to be fought over these questions. One might make the case for seeing the history of human cultures as an ongoing attempt to answer these questions. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

PHIL72130 Quest For Meaning

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to increase their awareness of themselves, others, and their world with a view to under standing the human need for a meaningful existence and the human search for a meaningful life. Using insights from the fields of psychology, philosophy, literature and other subjects, this interdisciplinary course is designed to assist students to better understand the ways in which they are seeking meaning for themselves and to expose students to new possibilities for personal significance.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

Language and Culture
Course # Courses
FREN71020 Introduction to French Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to standard French as well as Canadian French nuances. It is designed for students to develop basic French skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also study French culture in various contexts around the world. This course will be taught in both English and French to facilitate learning in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

FREN72020 French Language and Culture II

Description: This high beginner course builds on the Introduction to the French Language and Culture. The course is designed to further enhance beginner level language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also explore numerous facets of French Canadian culture. This course will be taught mostly in French with English used to facilitate learning in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN71020 or LANG7020
CoRequisites:

FREN73020 French Language III

Description: This intermediate course builds on French Language and Culture II. Students will continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on academic and professional communication within the French language and workplace cultural context. This course will be taught in French.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: FREN72020
CoRequisites:

SPAN71010 Introduction to the Spanish Language and Culture

Description: This beginner course introduces students to Spanish and the cultural variety in the Spanish speaking world. Students will develop listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course will be taught in Spanish and English to facilitate learning in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites:
CoRequisites:

SPAN72010 Spanish Language and Culture II

Description: This high beginner course reinforces students' knowledge of the Spanish language and reinforces the cultural variety in the Spanish speaking world. Students will develop academic and professional listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. This course will be taught mostly in Spanish with English used to facilitate learning in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: SPAN71010
CoRequisites:

SPAN73010 Spanish Language III

Description: This intermediate course builds on Spanish Language and Culture II. Students will continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on academic and professional communication within the Spanish language and workplace cultural context. This course will be taught in Spanish.
Hours: 42
Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites: SPAN72010
CoRequisites:

Program Status (Domestic)
Start DateCampusStatus**
AUG, 2020 Cambridge - Fountain Wait List
** Status applicable to domestic students
Program status for international students

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