Ken Diplock

​Name Ken Diplock
School School of Health & Life Sciences 
Program Bachelor of Environmental Public Health (Honours)
Academic and Professional Designations
  • PhD, Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo (2018)
  • Masters in Health Studies, Athabasca University (2008)
  • B.A.Sc., Public Health and Safety, Ryerson (2002)
  • Hon B.A., Kinesiology, Western (2000)
  • CPHI(C) (Certificate in Public Health Inspection (Canada)), issued 2002
Courses Taught
  • BIOL71000 - Human Biology
  • BIOL71011 - Applied Microbiology
  • ENVR71010 - Emerging Issues – Global and Local Concerns
  • ENVR72020 - Environmental Public Health Law
  • SCIE73000 - Food Science and Technology
  • FOOD73000 - Food Processing and Hygiene
  • RSCH73010 - Professional Research Internship I
  • RSCH74010 - Professional Research Internship II
  • ENVR74000 - Professional Practice
Areas of Expertise & Interest
  • Public Health Inspection
  • Food safety with an emphasis on Food Safety Education
  • Foodborne disease investigation and outbreak management
Industry Experience, Professional Currency Activities
  • 10 years experience in public health 
    • Student Public Health Inspector (PHI) – York Region (2002), Waterloo (2003) 
    • Certified PHI – Region of Waterloo (2003-2012)
  • Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors
    • Food Safety Councillor (2006-08), President Elect (2008-10), President (2010-12), Immediate Past President (2012-Present)
    • CIPHI rep on Implementation of Open for Business Initiative Steering Committee (2011) 
    • CIPHI Ontario Branch Educational Conferences – Chair (2010) Steering Committee Member (2011 and 2003)  
    • Children’s Environmental Health Working Group (2009-10)
    • Ontario Public Health Standars - Food Safety Protocol Writing Team (2008)
Major Research Projects, Scholarly Activities, and/or Publications
  • Diplock, K. J., Jones‐Bitton, A., Leatherdale, S. T., Rebellato, S., Hammond, D., & Majowicz, S. E. (2019). Food Safety Education Needs of High‐School Students: Leftovers, Lunches, and Microwaves. Journal of School Health89(7), 578-586.
  • Kenneth Diplock (2018). Food safety and Ontario high school students: assessing education needs and the utility of existing food handler training in improving behaviours. UWSpace. http://hdl.handle.net/10012/13296 
  • Diplock, K. J., Dubin, J. A., Leatherdale, S. T., Hammond, D., Jones-Bitton, A., & Majowicz, S. E. (2018). Observation of high school students' food handling behaviors: Do they improve following a food safety education intervention?. Journal of food protection81(6), 917-925.
  • Diplock, K. J., Jones-Bitton, A., Leatherdale, S. T., Rebellato, S., Dubin, J. A., & Majowicz, S. E. (2017). Over-confident and under-competent: exploring the importance of food safety education specific to high school students. Environmental Health Review60(3), 65-72.
  • Majowicz, S. E., Hammond, D., Dubin, J. A., Diplock, K. J., Jones-Bitton, A., Rebellato, S., & Leatherdale, S. T. (2017). A longitudinal evaluation of food safety knowledge and attitudes among Ontario high school students following a food handler training program. Food Control76, 108-116.
  • Brown, K. M., Diplock, K. J., & Majowicz, S. E. (2016). The environment in which behaviours are learned: a pilot assessment of high school teaching kitchens as food safety learning environments in Ontario. Environmental Health Review59(3), 88-95.
  • Majowicz, S. E., Diplock, K. J., Leatherdale, S. T., Bredin, C. T., Rebellato, S., Hammond, D., ... & Dubin, J. A. (2015). Food safety knowledge, attitudes and self-reported practices among Ontario high school students. Canadian Journal of Public Health106(8), e520-e526.
  • Gilbert, M., Monk, C., Wang, H., Diplock, K., & Landry, L. (2008). Screening Policies for Daycare Attendees: Lessons Learned from an Outbreak of E.coli O157:H7 in a Daycare in Waterloo, Ontario. Canadian Journal of Public Health / Revue Canadienne De Sante'e Publique,99(4), 281-285. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/41995102
  • Diplock, K. (2003). The potential of sushi rice to serve as a medium for bacterial growth. Environmental Health Review, 1, 109-116.
Additional Information I have presented at numerous professional conferences across Canada. I excel at bringing my professional experiences into the classroom and providing an exciting, and applied learning environment for students.



ken-diplock