Diploma electives course list

Registration opens: April 18, 2022
Registration closes: May 17, 2022

Please note: offerings vary from term to term and not all electives are suitable for all programs. For more information regarding limitations on taking a course for your program, please contact Jen Matthews.

Spring 2022 delivery approaches

  • Online asynchronous delivery: 100 percent online delivery with independent course completion and no assigned day or time requirements. These hours will be indicated on the right-hand side of your student timetable.
  • Online synchronous delivery: 100 percent online delivery with scheduled day and time course requirements. These hours will be indicated by a computer icon in the box in your student timetable.

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Spring 2022 General Education electives

Browse all elective courses offered this term:

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music 

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history... music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Indigenous Studies: The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Cancelled
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Concepts of Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of what stars are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of what stars are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Spanish Culture and Language II

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1010 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Cancelled
Description
This course builds on concepts and structures introduced in Spanish Culture and Language I. Students will continue to explore the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on culture outside Latin America. Students will attain a better understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment while continuing to build basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course with language functions comprising 40%.

Creative Writing

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1630 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course will encourage creative thinking and help students to develop their creative writing skills. We will be reading, writing and critiquing different styles of poetry, fiction, narrative articles for newspapers and magazines, plays and oral storytelling. The student will develop a portfolio for each section of the course and present his/her work to the class. As well, students will prepare one poem, article or short story for publication.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music 

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history... music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Indigenous Studies: The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Cancelled
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Concepts of Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of what stars are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Indigenous Studies: The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

French Culture and Language II

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1010 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Cancelled
Description
This course builds on concepts and structures introduced in French Culture and Language I. Students will continue to explore the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on culture outside Canada. Students will attain a better understanding of the contributions of French culture within the social and global environment while continuing to build basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course with language functions comprising 40%.

Creative Writing

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1630 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course will encourage creative thinking and help students to develop their creative writing skills. We will be reading, writing and critiquing different styles of poetry, fiction, narrative articles for newspapers and magazines, plays and oral storytelling. The student will develop a portfolio for each section of the course and present his/her work to the class. As well, students will prepare one poem, article or short story for publication.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music 

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history... music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online Synchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of what stars are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 1, 2, 7)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Life Beyond Earth

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1980 (Section 1, 2)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 1, 2)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 1, 3)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 1, 2, 5, 6)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required. This course fits into the General Education theme - Arts in Society.

Essentials of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 3, 4)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Life Beyond Earth

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1980 (Section 3, 4)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 3, 4)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.  This course fits into the General Education theme - Arts in Society.

Essentials of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 3)
Delivery
Status
Open
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 6)
Delivery
Status
Open
Description
In this course, students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online Asynchronous
Status
Closed
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 2)
Delivery
Status
Open
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.