Diploma electives course list

Registration opens: December 12, 2022
Registration closes: January 17, 2023

Winter 2023 delivery approaches

  • In person: classes held in person on a campus/site in a classroom/lab/shop/studio for the course duration
  • Online - asynchronous: 100 per cent online delivery with no assigned day or time requirements, independent course completion
  • Online - synchronous: 100 per cent online delivery with scheduled day and time course requirements

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Winter 2023 General Education electives

Please note: offerings vary from term to term and not all electives are suitable for all programs. If the course is not suitable, you will be restricted from registering for it in the Student Portal and will need to select another option.

Browse all elective courses offered this term:

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 6)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
FULL
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Political Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1360 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of political science and public administration. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks, and will emphasize the development of critical thinking and understanding of the link between politics and operational government. The role and functioning of political institutions and the processes of participation in Canada will be examined, together with the organizational arrangements of government and the bureaucracy.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 19)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to a Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Oceans

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1035 (Section 3, 5)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machnines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

Weather and Climate

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1460 (Section 3)
Delivery
In person - WATERLOO
Status
CLOSED
Description
Focuses on principles that enable students to attain basic understanding of the atmosphere and its processes. Students examine how information is gathered and presented in a weather forecast.  They investigate human activity and its impact on ozone depletion, air quality and climate.  

Political Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1360 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of political science and public administration. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks, and will emphasize the development of critical thinking and understanding of the link between politics and operational government. The role and functioning of political institutions and the processes of participation in Canada will be examined, together with the organizational arrangements of government and the bureaucracy.

Oceans

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1035 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

Weather and Climate

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1460 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Focuses on principles that enable students to attain basic understanding of the atmosphere and its processes. Students examine how information is gathered and presented in a weather forecast.  They investigate human activity and its impact on ozone depletion, air quality and climate.  

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machnines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 7)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOWNTOWN
Status
OPEN
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 10)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOWNTOWN
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Issues in Canadian Politics

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1420 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss our political institutions, processes and issues in order to better understand the problems faced by citizens of a functioning

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Oceans

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1035 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machnines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

Introduction to Social Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOON
Status
OPEN
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach one's potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society’s various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines: economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Foundations in Indigenous Studies I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1185 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOON
Status
OPEN
Description
This course introduces students to the key contemporary themes and topics central to the experiences of Indigenous people in Canada. Though and examination of modern history, this course will trace the impact of colonial policies from Indian residential schooling, the “60’s scoop,” the phenomenon of incarceration, to the millennium scoop. Knowledge gained in the course will be invaluable for students considering a career in which they will be interacting with Indigenous people or, for students seeking to increase their induvial understanding and sensitivity toward Indigenous perspectives. Student will explore key events and Indigenous worldviews with a view to intentionally and respectfully co-creating a vision reconciliation based on renewed relationships.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 8)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Indigenous Studies: The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Foundations of World Geography

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1155 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course serves as a fundamental systematic introduction to the spatial study of major geographical regions of the contemporary world. It introduces the concepts, methods, and perspectives on geography as a discipline, focusing on the regional variations and relationships between the natural environments and human societies. The emphasis is placed on the physical environment, including landforms, climate, waters, ecosystems, and human activities, including the historical-geographical context, demography, cultural characteristics, the geopolitical situation, and economy, that make world regions distinctive. The course provides the background for understanding the different regional dimensions of current global problems and how spatial phenomena shape different places in various physical and human geographic contexts.

French Culture and Language II

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1010 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course builds on concepts and structures introduced in French Culture and Language I. Students will continue to explore the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on culture outside Canada. Students will attain a better understanding of the contributions of French culture within the social and global environment while continuing to build basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course with language functions comprising 40%.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Weather and Climate

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1460 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Focuses on principles that enable students to attain basic understanding of the atmosphere and its processes. Students examine how information is gathered and presented in a weather forecast.  They investigate human activity and its impact on ozone depletion, air quality and climate.  

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machnines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 9)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOON
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Creative Writing

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1630 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course will encourage creative thinking and help students to develop their creative writing skills. We will be reading, writing and critiquing different styles of poetry, fiction, narrative articles for newspapers and magazines, plays and oral storytelling. The student will develop a portfolio for each section of the course and present his/her work to the class. As well, students will prepare one poem, article or short story for publication.

Spanish Culture and Language II

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1010 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course builds on concepts and structures introduced in Spanish Culture and Language I. Students will continue to explore the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on culture outside Latin America. Students will attain a better understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment while continuing to build basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course with language functions comprising 40%.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 6)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
How does John Williams unify the Star Wars films through music? Why does the sitar music of Ravi Shankar put people in a trance? What is it about African drum music that makes people want to dance? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history: music in sacred spaces, music for the stage and screen, music among friends and music in public places. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have purpose in our lives.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Political Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1360 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of political science and public administration. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks, and will emphasize the development of critical thinking and understanding of the link between politics and operational government. The role and functioning of political institutions and the processes of participation in Canada will be examined, together with the organizational arrangements of government and the bureaucracy.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Oceans

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1035 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

Weather and Climate

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1460 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Focuses on principles that enable students to attain basic understanding of the atmosphere and its processes. Students examine how information is gathered and presented in a weather forecast. They investigate human activity and its impact on ozone depletion, air quality and climate.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machnines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

Indigenous Creation Stories

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1205 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOON
Status
OPEN
Description
This course provides opportunities for students across disciplines to learn about creation stories from Indigenous cultures on Turtle Island (North America). Students will have the opportunity to explore the importance of Indigenous creation stories, how they are communicated, along with the teachings and worldviews they contain. Creation stories tell us not only about how humans came to be but how we are to behave and how we govern our relationships. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own creation stories in relation to Indigenous creation stories as well as examine counter origin stories put forward in Western science.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person - KITCHENER-DOON
Status
CLOSED
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Childrens Literature Across Cultures

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1015 (Section 1, 2 ,3, 4)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Children across the globe engage with stories as a way of learning about the world and their place within it. What can stories aimed at children tell us about ourselves and our social, political, and cultural world? What can these stories reveal about the values our society wishes to see in its children? How do changing perceptions of childhood shape the kinds of books (stories, plays, poems, and so on) that children’s authors produce? This course aims to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major patterns and themes found in Children’s Literature written in English, with a focus on international texts. Topics to be explored may include family structures, friendship (and other social relationships such as insider/outsider, allies, stranger, or even enemy), community, identity, self-image, adventure, tradition, and the difficult but necessary process of growing up.

Identity in Popular Culture: Avatars to Vampires

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1940 (Section 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school? Or, do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity. Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value.

Introduction to Social Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach one's potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society’s various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines: economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Issues in Canadian Politics

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1420 (Section 2, 3, 4)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss our political institutions, processes and issues in order to better understand the problems faced by citizens of a functioning democracy.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 2, 3, 4, 5)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include: beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to a Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.

Blood From a Stone: Social and Enviornmental Consequences of Mining

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1135 (Section 1, 2)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course will focus on the basic geological and chemical science behind mining, and also explore the social and environmental consequences of mining jewels (for example, diamonds), rare earth (Uranium, Colton), and fossil fuels. We will learn about the chemicals and elements needed to make a range of products, from diamond rings to cellphones. We will learn about geological / mining systems, as well as the legal, cultural, professional and ethical implications of mining.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 1, 2, 3)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Introduction to Anthropology

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1040 (Section 1, 2 ,3, 4)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This course is a general introduction to anthropology. The objective is to introduce students to the sub-disciplines of archaeological, linguistic, biological and cultural anthropology. The course will explore evolutionary theory, biological diversity of humans, language and compare different world cultures. Through activities, assignments, and discussions the student will explore the unique perspective of the field of anthropology in the social sciences, develop an appreciation for cultural studies, and recognize the importance of cultural relativity in understanding cultural practices and worldviews.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection 

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 1, 2)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 2, 3, 4)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.

Childrens Literature Across Cultures

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1015 (Section 5, 6, 7, 8)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Children across the globe engage with stories as a way of learning about the world and their place within it. What can stories aimed at children tell us about ourselves and our social, political, and cultural world? What can these stories reveal about the values our society wishes to see in its children? How do changing perceptions of childhood shape the kinds of books (stories, plays, poems, and so on) that children’s authors produce? This course aims to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major patterns and themes found in Children’s Literature written in English, with a focus on international texts. Topics to be explored may include family structures, friendship (and other social relationships such as insider/outsider, allies, stranger, or even enemy), community, identity, self-image, adventure, tradition, and the difficult but necessary process of growing up.

Identity in Popular Culture: Avatars to Vampires

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1940 (Section 6, 7, 8, 9,10)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school? Or, do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity. Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
In this course we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Introduction to Social Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach one's potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society’s various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines: economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Issues in Canadian Politics

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1420 (Section 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss our political institutions, processes and issues in order to better understand the problems faced by citizens of a functioning democracy.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 11, 12, 13, 14, 15)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include: beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Evil and Humanity

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1770 (Section 1, 2, 3, 4,5, 6, 7)
Delivery
Online - synchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course provides an introduction to the theme of evil and humanity. Course participants will evaluate and compare perspectives on, and responses to, the existence and symbols of evil in our society. Students will have the opportunity to engage in debate and compare ideas in a range of international religious, cultural, and philosophical traditions. In this course, we explore the question of evil through texts, film, and Internet sources ranging from biblical to modern times. Exploring the dark side of life, crime, transgression, and nightmarish systems through the lens of a number of theoretical perspectives, we engage with questions essential to humanity, including the nature of human beings, the basis for moral conventions, individual and collective responsibility, and goodness versus happiness. Students will reflect on how contemporary human-made atrocities challenge us to craft adequate moral, political, and juridical responses.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 10, 12, 13, 14)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 12, 13, 14, 15,16, 17, 18)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to a Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.

Blood From a Stone: Social and Enviornmental Consequences of Mining

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1135 (Section 3, 4, 5)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course will focus on the basic geological and chemical science behind mining, and also explore the social and environmental consequences of mining jewels (for example, diamonds), rare earth (Uranium, Colton), and fossil fuels. We will learn about the chemicals and elements needed to make a range of products, from diamond rings to cellphones. We will learn about geological / mining systems, as well as the legal, cultural, professional and ethical implications of mining.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 4, 5, 6, 7)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Introduction to Anthropology

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1040 (Section 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is a general introduction to anthropology. The objective is to introduce students to the sub-disciplines of archaeological, linguistic, biological and cultural anthropology. The course will explore evolutionary theory, biological diversity of humans, language and compare different world cultures. Through activities, assignments, and discussions the student will explore the unique perspective of the field of anthropology in the social sciences, develop an appreciation for cultural studies, and recognize the importance of cultural relativity in understanding cultural practices and worldviews.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 3, 4, 5)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 6, 7, 8)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
CLOSED
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.

Identity in Popular Culture: Avatars to Vampires

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1940 (Section 11)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school? Or, do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity. Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value.

Introduction to Social Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 13)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach one's potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society’s various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines: economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Issues in Canadian Politics

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1420 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss our political institutions, processes and issues in order to better understand the problems faced by citizens of a functioning democracy.

Multiculturalism

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 16)
Delivery
Online - asynchronous
Status
OPEN
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.