Diploma electives course list

Registration opens: August 9, 2021
Registration closes: September 15, 2021

Please note: offerings vary from term to term and not all electives are suitable for all programs. For more information regarding limitations on taking a course for your program, please contact Jen Matthews.

Fall 2021 delivery approaches

Remote: Remote courses have the benefit of both face-to-face with the course professor (over Zoom) and online learning. Students will be scheduled into a set-meeting time (minimum of 1 hour) to meet online as a class. The remaining course hours will be completed online, with students setting their own academic schedules to meet course deadlines.

Online: Online courses do not have any set meeting times (asynchronous). Students set their own academic schedules to meet the course deadlines. The professor will give written feedback and guidance on course work.

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Fall 2021 General Education electives

Browse all elective courses offered this term:

Political Science

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1360 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of political science and public administration. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks, and will emphasize the development of critical thinking and understanding of the link between politics and operational government. The role and functioning of political institutions and the processes of participation in Canada will be examined, together with the organizational arrangements of government and the bureaucracy.

Concepts of Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars... what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Olympics

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1100 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
The Olympics can be the defining moment for athletes, participating teams, and host countries. This General Education course will take an in-depth look at the impact of the Olympic Games from a social, political, economic, historical, and cultural perspective that can impact both the athlete and the country. The Olympics have altered the way we view traditional sport and this course will dive into controversial topics such as doping, amateur status, gender, and the view of the Olympic journey from varying perspectives.

Issues in World Affairs

Theme
Civic Live
Course Code
LIBS1180 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course will introduce the student to the strategic and economic issues that confront our world today and the historical events that led to them. Students will critically analyze such topics as the end of the Cold War, Regional Conflicts and Terrorism, Conflict Management, Environmental Sustainability, Human Rights and Globalization. Also topical issues that may arise during the semester will be analyzed and debated. Upon completion of the course the student will have a better understanding of their place in a culturally diverse global society and be better enabled to function effectively as a global citizen.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 4)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Olympics

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1100 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
The Olympics can be the defining moment for athletes, participating teams, and host countries. This General Education course will take an in-depth look at the impact of the Olympic Games from a social, political, economic, historical, and cultural perspective that can impact both the athlete and the country. The Olympics have altered the way we view traditional sport and this course will dive into controversial topics such as doping, amateur status, gender, and the view of the Olympic journey from varying perspectives.

The Art of Rock (A Social History of Rock & Roll)

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1900 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
The goal of this course is to take rock seriously as a musical form (where it came from, what formal structures it follows and how different styles evolved). We will explore the roots of rock and roll in the '50's and recognize how important the folk tradition, surfing music, the British invasion and protest music were to the '60's. We will also review the role of glitter rock, disco and punk in the '70s and appreciate new wave music, charity rock, music videos and the politics of censorship in the '80's. Finally we will discuss how hip hop, alternative, grunge, raves and the renewed interest in heavy metal and swing music and the success of counter culture festivals like Lollapalooza and Lilith Fair characterized the '90's.

Issues in World Affairs

Theme
Civic Live
Course Code
LIBS1180 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
This course will introduce the student to the strategic and economic issues that confront our world today and the historical events that led to them. Students will critically analyze such topics as the end of the Cold War, Regional Conflicts and Terrorism, Conflict Management, Environmental Sustainability, Human Rights and Globalization. Also topical issues that may arise during the semester will be analyzed and debated. Upon completion of the course the student will have a better understanding of their place in a culturally diverse global society and be better enabled to function effectively as a global citizen.

German Culture and Language

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
GERM1000 (Section 4)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
Explores the integrated facets of German culture and language. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of German culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the German language. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Indigenous Studies:  The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Spanish Culture and Language II

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1010 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course builds on concepts and structures introduced in Spanish Culture and Language I. Students will continue to explore the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on culture outside Latin America. Students will attain a better understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment while continuing to build basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course with language functions comprising 40%.

Exploring the World of Classical Myth

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1960 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the compelling world of Greek Myths from the prehistoric Mediterranean through the Classical world and beyond, reaching out to 21st century. The course emphasizes the broad diversity of cultural traditions as well as the role of the Greeks and their city-states at the crossroads between Europe, Asia and Africa, exploring classical mythology across the ancient lands stretching from Spain to India, and from the Eurasian steppes to Ethiopia. The legacy of Greek culture helps us to understand what is considered classical and based on core human values. Through interactive lectures, hands-on activities, discussions, and investigative assignments students will experience myth by taking the roles of viewers, listeners, readers and performers. They will examine the nature of myth in multi-faceted and authentic contexts. Students will also uncover the historical kernels of truth behind intricate mythical plots and characters. They will become familiar with the power of eternal literary narratives, archetypal concepts, images and symbols. Seminal discoveries in ancient history, classical archaeology, cultural anthropology, gender studies, psychology, astronomy, and other sciences will assist them with the exploration and in-depth understanding of the universal appeal of Greek Mythology to contemporary society.

The Art of Rock (A Social History of Rock & Roll)

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1900 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
The goal of this course is to take rock seriously as a musical form (where it came from, what formal structures it follows and how different styles evolved). We will explore the roots of rock and roll in the '50's and recognize how important the folk tradition, surfing music, the British invasion and protest music were to the '60's. We will also review the role of glitter rock, disco and punk in the '70s and appreciate new wave music, charity rock, music videos and the politics of censorship in the '80's. Finally we will discuss how hip hop, alternative, grunge, raves and the renewed interest in heavy metal and swing music and the success of counter culture festivals like Lollapalooza and Lilith Fair characterized the '90's.

Political Science

Theme
Civic Live
Course Code
LIBS1360 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of political science and public administration. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks, and will emphasize the development of critical thinking and understanding of the link between politics and operational government. The role and functioning of political institutions and the processes of participation in Canada will be examined, together with the organizational arrangements of government and the bureaucracy.

Concepts of Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars... what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Indigenous Studies: The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Introduction to World Culture

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1680 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
In order to enhance an individual's sense of personal understanding and contribution to civic life, there must be a willingness and ability to appreciate others' cultural similarities and differences. In this course, students will, through a variety of mediums, examine a number of world cultures, specifically their economic, environmental, political, and social characteristics while furthering a respect for cultural and religious diversity.

Olympics

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1100 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
The Olympics can be the defining moment for athletes, participating teams, and host countries. This General Education course will take an in-depth look at the impact of the Olympic Games from a social, political, economic, historical, and cultural perspective that can impact both the athlete and the country. The Olympics have altered the way we view traditional sport and this course will dive into controversial topics such as doping, amateur status, gender, and the view of the Olympic journey from varying perspectives.

Exploring the World of Classical Myth

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1960 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the compelling world of Greek Myths from the prehistoric Mediterranean through the Classical world and beyond, reaching out to 21st century. The course emphasizes the broad diversity of cultural traditions as well as the role of the Greeks and their city-states at the crossroads between Europe, Asia and Africa, exploring classical mythology across the ancient lands stretching from Spain to India, and from the Eurasian steppes to Ethiopia. The legacy of Greek culture helps us to understand what is considered classical and based on core human values. Through interactive lectures, hands-on activities, discussions, and investigative assignments students will experience myth by taking the roles of viewers, listeners, readers and performers. They will examine the nature of myth in multi-faceted and authentic contexts. Students will also uncover the historical kernels of truth behind intricate mythical plots and characters. They will become familiar with the power of eternal literary narratives, archetypal concepts, images and symbols. Seminal discoveries in ancient history, classical archaeology, cultural anthropology, gender studies, psychology, astronomy, and other sciences will assist them with the exploration and in-depth understanding of the universal appeal of Greek Mythology to contemporary society.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 4)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars... what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 4)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars... what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Concepts of Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 4)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

French Culture and Language II

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1010 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course builds on concepts and structures introduced in French Culture and Language I. Students will continue to explore the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on culture outside Canada. Students will attain a better understanding of the contributions of French culture within the social and global environment while continuing to build basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course with language functions comprising 40%.

Exploring the World of Classical Myth

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1960 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the compelling world of Greek Myths from the prehistoric Mediterranean through the Classical world and beyond, reaching out to 21st century. The course emphasizes the broad diversity of cultural traditions as well as the role of the Greeks and their city-states at the crossroads between Europe, Asia and Africa, exploring classical mythology across the ancient lands stretching from Spain to India, and from the Eurasian steppes to Ethiopia. The legacy of Greek culture helps us to understand what is considered classical and based on core human values. Through interactive lectures, hands-on activities, discussions, and investigative assignments students will experience myth by taking the roles of viewers, listeners, readers and performers. They will examine the nature of myth in multi-faceted and authentic contexts. Students will also uncover the historical kernels of truth behind intricate mythical plots and characters. They will become familiar with the power of eternal literary narratives, archetypal concepts, images and symbols. Seminal discoveries in ancient history, classical archaeology, cultural anthropology, gender studies, psychology, astronomy, and other sciences will assist them with the exploration and in-depth understanding of the universal appeal of Greek Mythology to contemporary society.

The Art of Rock (A Social History of Rock & Roll)

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1900 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
The goal of this course is to take rock seriously as a musical form (where it came from, what formal structures it follows and how different styles evolved). We will explore the roots of rock and roll in the '50's and recognize how important the folk tradition, surfing music, the British invasion and protest music were to the '60's. We will also review the role of glitter rock, disco and punk in the '70s and appreciate new wave music, charity rock, music videos and the politics of censorship in the '80's. Finally we will discuss how hip hop, alternative, grunge, raves and the renewed interest in heavy metal and swing music and the success of counter culture festivals like Lollapalooza and Lilith Fair characterized the '90's.

Concepts of Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 5)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars... what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 3)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Indigenous Studies:  The North Amercian Journey

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 2)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Open
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection 

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 1)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course will explore Science Fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of SF as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

Thinking Through Zombies

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1950 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course explores how humans the meaning of the undead. The course begins with asking what zombies’ popularity reflects about our culture and civilization. Readings, films and discussions will focus on critical evaluation and reflection about the zombie trope that include lessons about racism, slavery, anxiety about the body, cannibalism, genocide, panic and plague, gender, war and social-economic structures. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth contemporary and historical representations of zombies, and to develop a conclusion about the significance of those representations in the search for meaning.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Live
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 6)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 4, 8)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Life Beyond Earth

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1980 (Section 4, 7)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

Cults and Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Introduction to Anthropology

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1040 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This course is a general introduction to anthropology. The objective is to introduce students to the sub-disciplines of archaeological, linguistic, biological and cultural anthropology. The course will explore evolutionary theory, biological diversity of humans, language and compare different world cultures. Through activities, assignments, and discussions the student will explore the unique perspective of the field of anthropology in the social sciences, develop an appreciation for cultural studies, and recognize the importance of cultural relativity in understanding cultural practices and worldviews.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 4)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages & The Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course will explore Science Fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of SF as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

Thinking Through Zombies

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1950 (Section 3, 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course explores how humans the meaning of the undead. The course begins with asking what zombies’ popularity reflects about our culture and civilization. Readings, films and discussions will focus on critical evaluation and reflection about the zombie trope that include lessons about racism, slavery, anxiety about the body, cannibalism, genocide, panic and plague, gender, war and social-economic structures. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth contemporary and historical representations of zombies, and to develop a conclusion about the significance of those representations in the search for meaning.

Essentials Of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 6)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Live
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 4, 5, 6)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 4, 5, 8)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 22)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to a Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.

Life Beyond Earth

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1980 (Section 4, 6, 7)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 4, 5, 6, 7)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

Cults and Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 3, 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Introduction to Anthropology

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1040 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This course is a general introduction to anthropology. The objective is to introduce students to the sub-disciplines of archaeological, linguistic, biological and cultural anthropology. The course will explore evolutionary theory, biological diversity of humans, language and compare different world cultures. Through activities, assignments, and discussions the student will explore the unique perspective of the field of anthropology in the social sciences, develop an appreciation for cultural studies, and recognize the importance of cultural relativity in understanding cultural practices and worldviews.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 3, 4, 5)
Delivery
Remote
Status
Closed
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 3, 4, 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages & The Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 1, 2, 3)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course will explore Science Fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of SF as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

Thinking Through Zombies

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1950 (Section 1, 2, 6, 7)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course explores how humans the meaning of the undead. The course begins with asking what zombies’ popularity reflects about our culture and civilization. Readings, films and discussions will focus on critical evaluation and reflection about the zombie trope that include lessons about racism, slavery, anxiety about the body, cannibalism, genocide, panic and plague, gender, war and social-economic structures. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth contemporary and historical representations of zombies, and to develop a conclusion about the significance of those representations in the search for meaning.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Essentials Of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Live
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 2, 3, 7, 9)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 12, 20, 21, 25, 26)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction. It provides a structured and supportive learning environment to help students define and develop the academic habits and skills for a successful transition to a Canadian college culture. The course will address the diverse issues facing students who are beginning their academic path in college.

Life Beyond Earth

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1980 (Section 1, 2, 3)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 1, 3)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

Cults and Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 1, 2, 3)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
In this course, students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 1, 2, 6, 7)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Introduction to Anthropology

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1040 (Section 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This course is a general introduction to anthropology. The objective is to introduce students to the sub-disciplines of archaeological, linguistic, biological and cultural anthropology. The course will explore evolutionary theory, biological diversity of humans, language and compare different world cultures. Through activities, assignments, and discussions the student will explore the unique perspective of the field of anthropology in the social sciences, develop an appreciation for cultural studies, and recognize the importance of cultural relativity in understanding cultural practices and worldviews.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 1, 2, 6)
Delivery
Online
Status
Open
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of Spanish culture and language with a focus on Latin America. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of Spanish culture within the social and global environment, while building basic linguistic aspects of the Spanish language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic Spanish vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

The Middle Ages & The Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 2, 3, 4)
Delivery
Online
Status
Closed
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.